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Bone of legendary king may be in museum

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By The Associated Press
Friday, Jan. 17, 2014, 7:15 p.m.
 

LONDON — Researchers said Friday they may have discovered remains of King Alfred the Great, the 9th-century royal remembered for protecting England from the Vikings and educating a largely illiterate nation.

The University of Winchester announced that a pelvis found in a box of bones in the city's museum is likely to be either from the medieval ruler or his son, King Edward the Elder.

Nick Thorpe, head of the university's archaeology department, said he and his colleagues are “extremely excited to have been able to plausibly link this human bone to one of these two crucial figures in English history.”

Alfred's bones are known to have been moved after he died, eventually being deposited at Hyde Abbey in Winchester, southwest of London. But an 18th-century building project turned the site into a jail and a 19th-century antiquary, John Mellor, boasted of having unearthed the king's bones.

After the remains of King Richard III were unearthed in 2012, researchers went to work hunting for Alfred.

 

 
 


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