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Iran's top leader calls U.S. 'enemy'

| Saturday, Feb. 8, 2014, 7:27 p.m.

In a speech to air force commanders in Tehran, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, Iran's supreme leader, accused the United States of hypocrisy and of seeking to undermine his country's independence, the state-run Fars news agency reported.

“The Iranian nation should pay attention to the recent negotiations and the rude remarks of the Americans so that everyone gets to know the enemy well,” Khamenei said as the Islamic Republic prepares to celebrate the 35th anniversary of its formation on Tuesday.

The celebrations will include state-sponsored rallies in Tehran and occur as the two countries seek to resolve a decade-old dispute over Iran's nuclear work.

Khamenei has given consent to Iran's President Hassan Rouhani to pursue outreach policies, while maintaining that the United States is fundamentally Iran's adversary.

Rouhani signed an interim accord in November with six world powers. That marked the first breakthrough in an effort to curb Iran's atomic program.

Under the agreement, Iran will benefit from about $7 billion in sanctions relief.

“The Americans speak in their private meetings with our officials in one way, and they speak differently outside these meetings,” Khamenei said. “This is hypocrisy and the bad and evil will of the enemy.”

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