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Violences flares as Thai police, protesters clash

Why are they demonstrating?

• Protests started in November when Thailand's lower house passed a controversial amnesty that could allow Thaksin Shinawatra, who was ousted in a military coup in 2006, to return to Thailand without serving time in jail.

• The protesters tend to be urban and middle-class voters united by their opposition to Thaksin.

• Thaksin-allied parties have won the last five elections, because of their rural support base.

Sources: BBC, CFR.org

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By The Associated Press
Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014, 5:24 p.m.
 

BANGKOK — Gunbattles broke out on Tuesday as hundreds of riot police made their strongest attempt to clear anti-government protest sites around Thailand's capital, killing at least four injuring 64.

Multiple gunshots were heard near the prime minister's offices, where riot police wearing helmets and bulletproof vests had started to remove protesters and dismantle a makeshift stage. Witnesses said a grenade was thrown at police, and shots were then fired by both sides. Police withdrew after a series of clashes.

In another blow for Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, the state anti-corruption agency accused her of improperly handling an expensive rice subsidy scheme, putting her in jeopardy of being impeached.

The National Anti-Corruption Commission said Yingluck's government proceeded with the scheme despite advice from experts that it was potentially wasteful and prone to corruption. The government has been months late in making payments to farmers for the rice they pledged to sell at above-market prices.

The commission said Yingluck has been called to formally hear the charges on Feb. 27. If it decides to submit the case to the Senate for possible impeachment, Yingluck will immediately be suspended from performing her official duties pending a Senate trial.

Yingluck's elected government has been attempting to avoid violence to keep the powerful military from stepping in. Thailand has been wracked by political unrest since 2006, when Yingluck's brother, former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra, was accused of corruption and abuse of power, and ousted.

Since then, his supporters and opponents have vied for power, sometimes violently.

Erawan emergency medical services said three civilians and a police officer died and 64 others were injured in Tuesday's clashes, including journalists covering the protests for a Hong Kong TV station and the Spanish news agency EFE.

The violence erupted after police moved into several locations around the city to detain and remove protesters who have been camped out for weeks to press for Yingluck's resignation. They want the formation of an unelected people's council to implement reforms to end corruption and remove the Shinawatra family from politics.

They have blocked access to government offices since late last year and occupied key intersections around Bangkok for about a month. Until now, the police had refrained from dispersing them for fear of unleashing violence.

But on Monday, the government's special security command center announced it would reclaim five protest sites around the city for public use, a move made possible under a state of emergency declared in January. Thousands of police officers, including armed anti-riot squads, were deployed across the city Tuesday in an operation the government called “Peace for Bangkok.”

Earlier Tuesday, 144 protesters near the Energy Ministry in the northern part of the city were peacefully detained and herded onto police trucks to be taken away for questioning, Department of Special Investigation chief Tharit Pengdit said.

Transport Minister Chadchart Sittipunt told The Associated Press the protesters hijacked two of the city's public buses and used them to block a rally site at the Interior Ministry near the Grand Palace.

Protest leader Suthep Thaugsuban said in his nightly speech to followers that they should go Wednesday to harass Yingluck at her temporary office at the Defense Ministry.

“We will pursue her everywhere, anywhere, anytime, all the time,” he said. “We are on a mission to follow and chase Yingluck the murderer out of this country. It is time to run this she-devil out of our native land!”

 

 
 


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