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Blair offered to aid Murdoch in hacking scandal

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By The Los Angeles Times

Published: Wednesday, Feb. 19, 2014, 5:42 p.m.

LONDON — Former British Prime Minister Tony Blair offered to act as a secret adviser to Rupert Murdoch and two of his newspaper executives as they confronted revelations of illegal phone hacking, a London jury heard on Wednesday.

The disclosure — contained in an email sent by Rebekah Brooks, a former executive of News International, once the British branch of Murdoch's News Corp. media empire, and to Murdoch's son and deputy, James — was revealed as prosecutors wrapped up their case against seven defendants charged in the scandal.

In the email dated July 11, 2011, Brooks said she had spent an hour on the phone with Blair, who was “available for you, KRM (Rupert Murdoch) and me as unofficial adviser, but needs to be between us.”

Brooks is one of the defendants in the trial stemming from revelations that employees at Murdoch's now-defunct News of the World tabloid, which she edited, eavesdropped on the voicemails of celebrities, politicians, royalty and even a teenager who was sexually assaulted and killed. The public outcry prompted the Murdoch family to close the popular, 168-year-old Sunday paper.

Brooks faces charges that include conspiracy to intercept cellphone messages, bribery of public officials and conspiracy to pervert the course of justice by concealing evidence. Also on trial are Andy Coulson, another former News of the World editor who became chief press officer to Prime Minister David Cameron, Brooks' husband, Charlie, and other former senior editors and journalists. All the defendants deny the charges against them.

According to the email read in court Wednesday, Blair advised Brooks to set up an independent, public inquiry led by a criminal lawyer and “get them to publish a Hutton-style report,” a reference to an investigation that in 2004 cleared Blair's government of wrongdoing in its handling of intelligence about Saddam Hussein's weapons of mass destruction in the run-up to the Iraq War.

Blair's advice, Brooks continued, was to “publish part one of the report at the same time as the police closes its inquiry and clear you and accept shortcomings and new solutions and process, and part two when any trials are over.”

In a statement issued later Wednesday, Blair's office confirmed that the conversation took place but said, “This was Mr. Blair simply giving informal advice over the phone.”

 

 
 


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