TribLIVE

| USWorld

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Europe prepares to punish Moscow

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By The Washington Post
Tuesday, March 11, 2014, 9:06 p.m.
 

SEVASTOPOL, Ukraine — As Crimea grew more militarized and isolated on Tuesday, and hopes for a diplomatic solution to the Ukraine crisis looked increasingly faint, European nations said they were preparing to punish Russia with sanctions within days.

European officials met in London to draw up penalties against Russia, likely to include asset freezes and travel bans, unless the country accepts a U.S. proposal to stop its expansion in Crimea and start discussions with Ukraine's new government. Until now, Western efforts to curb Russia's actions have focused on rhetoric and largely symbolic gestures, rather than measures that would cause meaningful pain in Moscow.

The European restrictions could mark a substantial escalation in a conflict that has pitted Russia against the West in a way not seen since the Cold War. But the Obama administration has refused to set a deadline for U.S. sanctions or indicate a specific Russian action that would trigger them. And analysts say that even tough sanctions are unlikely to force President Vladimir Putin to change course in Ukraine, given the depth of Russian interests there.

“For the Kremlin, and the wider elites that support it, the fate of Ukraine is a vital interest. They've tied Ukraine's future to their own,” said James Sherr, an associate fellow at the London-based think tank Chatham House. “Any sanctions the EU is likely to come up with will not be sufficient to change that calculation.”

In Washington, State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said the Treasury Department is working on an escalating set of measures that allow the United States to “calibrate sanctions and other actions depending on the steps that Russia takes.”

Meanwhile, Oleksandr Turchynov, Ukraine's acting president, said his country would have to rebuild its military “effectively from scratch.” The pro-Western leader said Ukraine has only 6,000 combat-ready infantry, compared with 200,000 Russian troops on Ukraine's eastern border.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read World

  1. Comets hold life building blocks
  2. Al-Qaida branch in Syria threatens U.S.-backed forces
  3. Vibrantly colored mural spread across 200 homes in central Mexico city
  4. Taliban fracture outcome unclear
  5. Talks fail to yield accord in Pacific
  6. Al-Qaida group in Syria targeted by U.S.-led coalition airstrikes
  7. Firebombing kills Palestinian toddler, wounds family; Jewish settlers blamed
  8. Senate to grill United Nations agency chief Amano on Iran nuclear pact
  9. Zimbabwe suspends hunts amid outcry over lion’s death
  10. 2013 death of Taliban leader Mullah Omar confirmed
  11. China says U.S. trying to militarize South China Sea