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SEALs intervene in Libyan oil fight, seize tanker

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By The Associated Press
Monday, March 17, 2014, 9:12 p.m.
 

TRIPOLI — Navy SEALs seized an oil tanker off the Mediterranean island of Cyprus, stopping an attempt by a Libyan militia to sell the shipload of crude in defiance of the Libyan government. Supporters of the militia, which calls for autonomy for the eastern half of Libya, vowed on Monday to try again to export oil from the ports they control.

The attempted sale of the oil — Libya's most crucial resource — was a stark symbol of the weakness of Libya's central government, which has been unable to impose its authority over the North African nation since the ouster and killing of longtime strongman Moammar Gadhafi in 2011. Power in the country has fragmented among multiple, heavily armed militias, most of them regionally based.

An eastern-based militia headed by a commander named Ibrahim Jedran seized a series of oil facilities in the east last summer, slowing Libya's output of 1.4 billion barrels a day to a trickle and gouging the government's biggest revenue source. Jedran is part of a movement seeking autonomy for the eastern half of Libya, known by the historical name of Cyrenaica, which has long complained of discrimination by governments in Tripoli. Last week, his militia loaded a North Korean-flagged tanker with oil worth $30 million at the port of al-Sidra, and the tanker succeeded in eluding pro-government forces and escaping to sea.

The tanker, Morning Glory, was seized late Sunday by Navy commandos in international waters off Cyprus, the Pentagon said in a statement. Rear Adm. John Kirby said no one was injured in the operation, which was approved by President Obama.

The Morning Glory will return to Libya under the control of sailors from the USS Stout, it said. It is not known to whom the oil was to be sold or who owns the tanker.

The attempted oil sale fueled a political crisis in Libya. The parliament, where Islamist lawmakers had a long rivalry with then-Prime Minister Ali Zidan, used the crisis to vote him out, saying it had underlined his weakness.

Libya's interim government said in a statement that the oil cargo will be unloaded when it arrives in Libya. The crew is safe and will be dealt with in accordance with international law, it added. It thanked the United States and Cyprus and “all those who contributed” to the vessel's capture, adding, “Oil is the backbone of the national economy and tampering with it ... is unacceptable.”

On her Twitter account, U.S. Ambassador to Libya Deborah K. Jones wrote: “glad we were able to respond positively to Libya's request for help in preventing illegal sale of its oil on stateless ship.”

The attempt to sell oil from the seized terminals was a first. In response, the parliament ordered a group of militias to try to storm oil facilities held by Jedran's group. The militias, led by fighters from the western city of Misrata, clashed with Jedran's fighters in the coastal city of Sirte, but the parliament paused the offensive to give time for a mediated solution before moving directly on the oil facilities.

Autonomy proponent Essam al-Jihani said his group is preparing to load a second tanker for export, although it was not possible to verify his claims. Al-Jihani belongs to the Cyrenaica Political Bureau, a body set up by Jedran and others in the autonomy movement with the aim of replacing the state oil company and distributing oil revenues more equitably to the east.

Jedran's group was holding talks with tribal elders who are trying to mediate a peaceful resolution. According to the Libyan al-Ahrar TV network, Abed Rabbo al-Barassi, the head of the Cyrenaica Executive Bureau, one of the bodies set up by Jedran's group, said that there will be no talks until the parliament withdraws its decision to form a military force to liberate the oil terminals.

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