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Air search resumes for plane debris

| Thursday, March 27, 2014, 9:48 p.m.
A woman places a paper crane as a symbol for hope and healing during a ceremony on Thursday, March 27, 2014, in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, in memory of passengers on board the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370.

PERTH, Australia — An air search of the remote southern Indian Ocean resumed on Friday, seeking to confirm whether hundreds of objects spotted by satellites are debris from a Malaysian jetliner presumed to have crashed almost three weeks ago with the loss of all on board.

A Chinese Ilyushin IL-76 took off from Perth before dawn, heading 1,550 miles southwest into the search area where high wind and icy weather had halted flights on Thursday.

The disappearance of the Malaysia Airlines jet, which vanished from civilian radar screens less than an hour after taking off from Kuala Lumpur on a routine flight to Beijing on March 8, has gripped the world and baffled investigators.

Officials believe someone on Flight MH370 may have shut off the plane's communications systems before flying it thousands of miles off course where it crashed into the ocean in one of the most isolated and foreboding regions on the planet.

Theories range from a hijacking to sabotage or a possible suicide by one of the pilots, but investigators have not ruled out technical problems.

The search zone centers on the latest sightings of possible wreckage that were captured by Thai and Japanese satellites in roughly the same frigid expanse of sea as earlier images reported by France, Australia and China.

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