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Supporters of deposed Egyptian President Morsy protest in streets

AFP/Getty Images
Egyptian journalist, Mayada Ashraf poses as she covers a protest of Islamists against ex-army chief Abdel Fattah al-Sisi's presidency bid on March 28, 2014 in the northern neighbourhood of Ein Shams, outside Cairo. Mayada Ashraf, who worked for privately owned Al-Dustour newspaper and freelanced for news website Masr Alarabia, was shot in the head while covering the clashes. AFP PHOTO / MAHMOUD BAKKAR MAHMOUD BAKKAR/AFP/Getty Images

Torture claims

Egyptian security forces routinely torture detainees as young as 15, according to testimony given to the BBC.

Former detainees — often held for being near a protest — have described being electrocuted, beaten and sexually abused by security personnel.

The army-backed interim government has detained as many as 20,000 since it assumed power in July.

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By The Associated Press
Friday, March 28, 2014, 6:24 p.m.
 

CAIRO — Hundreds of supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsy took to the streets on Friday to protest the decision by the country's former military chief to run in the presidential election, sparking scattered clashes that claimed four lives.

Abdel-Fattah al-Sissi, the former military chief, led the ouster of Morsy in July and is widely expected to win the presidency.

The rallies took place in several cities. Demonstrators attempted to block with burning tires a main road in Cairo that leads to the famed Giza pyramids, and students from the Islamic university of Al-Azhar threw rocks and Molotov cocktails at security forces.

Among those killed was a female journalist, Mayada Ashraf, who died while covering clashes in the eastern Cairo district of Ain Shams.

A 39-year-old protester named Mohammed said Ashraf was steps away from him when she was shot in the head by security forces using live ammunition. He gave only his first name out of fear of retribution.

Ashraf worked for the privately owned El-Dustor newspaper. It reported online that it had urged authorities to halt gunfire in the area to give ambulances a chance to retrieve the body of the slain journalist.

A second news site that Ashraf contributed to, Masr al-Arabiya, posted a video purportedly showing the reporter with her headscarf soaked in blood as she was being carried over a protester's shoulder.

 

 
 


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