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Taliban attacks charity in Kabul

AFP/Getty Images - TOPSHOTS Foreigners take refuge behind a generator after they were evacuated from a guesthouses during an attack by Taliban gunmen on March 28, 2014. Gunfire and explosions rocked Kabul as Taliban militants attacked a guesthouse used by foreigners, the latest violence to rock the Afghan capital just over a week before the presidential election. AFP PHOTO/WAKIL KOHSARWAKIL KOHSAR/AFP/Getty Images
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>AFP/Getty Images</em></div>TOPSHOTS Foreigners take refuge behind a generator after they were evacuated from a guesthouses during an attack by Taliban gunmen on March 28, 2014.  Gunfire and explosions rocked Kabul as Taliban militants attacked a guesthouse used by foreigners, the latest violence to rock the Afghan capital just over a week before the presidential election.  AFP PHOTO/WAKIL KOHSARWAKIL KOHSAR/AFP/Getty Images
AFP/Getty Images - TOPSHOTS An Afghan man who was injured during an attack on a guesthouse by Taliban gunmen leaves the scene of the attack in Kabul on March 28, 2014. Gunfire and explosions rocked Kabul as Taliban militants attacked a guesthouse used by foreigners, the latest violence to rock the Afghan capital just over a week before the presidential election. US-based aid group Roots for Peace, which works to replace minefields with vineyards, said that its guesthouse was under attack in Kabul, and that at least three Afghans were wounded. AFP PHOTO/WAKIL KOHSARWAKIL KOHSAR/AFP/Getty Images
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>AFP/Getty Images</em></div>TOPSHOTS An Afghan man who was injured during an attack on a guesthouse by Taliban gunmen leaves the scene of the attack in Kabul on March 28, 2014.  Gunfire and explosions rocked Kabul as Taliban militants attacked a guesthouse used by foreigners, the latest violence to rock the Afghan capital just over a week before the presidential election.  US-based aid group Roots for Peace, which works to replace minefields with vineyards, said that its guesthouse was under attack in Kabul, and that at least three Afghans were wounded.  AFP PHOTO/WAKIL KOHSARWAKIL KOHSAR/AFP/Getty Images

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By The Washington Post
Friday, March 28, 2014, 8:24 p.m.
 

KABUL, Afghanistan — The Taliban attacked the offices of a U.S.-based charity on Friday, a complex assault that occurred just over a week before the country's presidential election.

The attack, involving a suicide car bombing and four gunmen, was directed at the Roots of Peace facility in the Kart-e-Char neighborhood of southwestern Kabul, the organization's founder and chief executive, Heidi Kuhn, confirmed in an e-mail.

After a standoff of several hours, 25 foreign residents of the Roots of Peace guesthouse were released when Afghan forces intervened, killing the four attackers. An Afghan girl died during the attack.

There has been a surge in violence in the Afghan capital in recent weeks, including several attacks on Western and high-profile Afghan targets. A number of foreign election observers and other Westerners have left Kabul, fearing continued violence.

Although the attack proved to be less deadly than previous assaults on high-profile targets, it adds to an already tense security environment. The Taliban has pledged to execute attacks across the country that would threaten voters and destabilize the country's fragile political process. The election is scheduled for April 5.

In recent months, there appears to have been a shift in Taliban tactics resulting in a more concerted effort to target foreign civilians in Kabul.

After last week's attack on the Serena hotel, which left nine people dead, two groups of election observers — the National Democratic Institute and the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe — withdrew their employees from the country.

In a statement, the Taliban said it had attacked the Roots of Peace guesthouse because it was used by foreigners as a “church used to convert Afghans.”

The nonprofit organization has no stated religious affiliation. Roots of Peace is a California-based group that has worked in Afghanistan for a decade helping local farmers cultivate vineyards and orchards. According to its website, the group has received millions of dollars in funding from the U.S. Agency for International Development.

Although all of the organization's employees survived, some reportedly were injured by shattered glass.

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