TribLIVE

| USWorld

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Russia quiets Voice of America

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By Bloomberg News
Saturday, April 12, 2014, 8:33 p.m.
 

The Voice of America, which has broadcast from inside Russia since the end of the Cold War, has been silenced in the new chill between Russia and the United States.

VOA's over-the-air broadcasts on the 810 AM frequency in Moscow ceased at the start of April, when Russian authorities refused to renew a long-standing broadcasting contract, according to a statement by the U.S. Broadcasting Board of Governors, the independent federal agency that oversees the American government's international media operations.

The Voice of Russia, the nation's international radio broadcasting service, said April 10 that the government in Moscow moved against an “Orwellian U.S. propaganda tool.” The action fell amid mounting tensions with the United States and its allies over Ukraine and Russia's annexation of Crimea.

“The Russian Government, which has so far been patient as the U.S./NATO attempt to continue to surround it with missiles and continue to demonize everything Russian, is beginning to take serious measures to protect itself, its people and its allies,” the Voice of Russia said on its website.

While Russian authorities ended VOA's terrestrial broadcasts in Russia, the service funded through the Congress continues to expand audio and video news and information online.

“That's where the next-generation audiences are in any case,” said Lynne Weil, a spokeswoman for the Broadcasting Board of Governors.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read World

  1. Surfer seriously injured in Australian shark attack
  2. India hangs man who raised funds in support of 1993’s deadly Mumbai bombings
  3. Former Omar deputy to lead Afghan Taliban
  4. Extremist strikes again in attack on gay parade in Jerusalem
  5. China says U.S. trying to militarize South China Sea
  6. Turkey aims guns at Kurdish rebels
  7. Scientists warn about killer robots
  8. Afghan intelligence: Taliban leader Mullah Omar dead 2 years
  9. Debris on French island possibly that of missing Malaysia Airlines flight
  10. 2013 death of Taliban leader Mullah Omar confirmed
  11. Nigeria celebrates year without polio