TribLIVE

| USWorld

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

International panel calls cost to fight climate change 'modest' but urges quick action

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By The Associated Press
Sunday, April 13, 2014, 6:48 p.m.
 

BERLIN — The cost of keeping global warming in check is “relatively modest,” but only if the world acts quickly to reverse the buildup of heat-trapping gases in the atmosphere, the head of the U.N.'s expert panel on climate change said on Sunday.

Such gases, mainly CO2 from the burning of fossil fuels, rose on average by 2.2 percent a year in 2000-2010, driven by the use of coal in the power sector, officials said as they introduced the Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Change's report on measures to fight global warming.

Without additional measures to contain emissions, global temperatures will rise about 5 degrees to 7 degrees by 2100 compared to current levels, the panel said.

“The longer we delay, the higher would be the cost,” IPCC chairman Rajendra Pachauri said after the panel's weeklong session in Berlin. “But despite that, the point I'm making is that even now, the cost is not something that's going to bring about a major disruption of economic systems. It's well within our reach.”

The IPCC, an international body assessing climate science, projected that shifting the energy system from fossil fuels to zero- or low-carbon sources, including wind and solar power, would reduce consumption growth by about 0.06 percentage points per year, adding that that didn't take into account the economic benefits of reduced climate change. “The loss in consumption is relatively modest,” Pachauri said.

Secretary of State John Kerry called it a global economic opportunity.

“So many of the technologies that will help us fight climate change are far cheaper, more readily available and better performing than they were when the last IPCC assessment was released less than a decade ago,” Kerry said.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read World

  1. Debris on French island possibly that of missing Malaysia Airlines flight
  2. Exiled Yemen leader orders anti-rebel fighters to merge with army to battle Houthis
  3. 2013 death of Taliban leader Mullah Omar confirmed
  4. Scientists warn about killer robots
  5. Afghan intelligence: Taliban leader Mullah Omar dead 2 years
  6. U.N. projects world’s population to reach 9.7 billion by 2050, 11.2 billion by end of century
  7. Buildings in West Bank settlement torn down by order of Israel’s Supreme Court
  8. Nigeria celebrates year without polio
  9. Turks, Kurdish rebels deepen hostility
  10. Ships cross Egypt’s New Suez Canal in first test-run
  11. Suicide truck bomb kills 9, damages luxury hotel in Somali capital