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First worst in Chilean city in more than 60 years; 11 die, 500 homes destroyed

| Sunday, April 13, 2014, 6:24 p.m.

VALPARAISO, Chile — A raging fire leaped from hilltop to hilltop in this colorful port city, killing at least 11 people and destroying more than 500 homes. More than 10,000 people were evacuated, including more than 200 female inmates in a prison.

The fire began Saturday afternoon in a forested area above ramshackle housing on one of the city's 42 hilltops and spread quickly as high winds blowing seaward rained hot ash over wooden houses and narrow streets. Electricity failed as the fire grew, with towering, sparking flames turning the night sky orange over a darkening, destroyed horizon. Eventually, neighborhoods on six hilltops were reduced to ashes, including one hill just several blocks from Chile's parliament building.

“It's a tremendous tragedy. This could be the worst fire in the city's history,” President Michelle Bachelet said as firefighters contained most of the blazes, mobilizing 18 helicopters and planes to drop water on hotspots on Sunday.

Bachelet warned that the toll of death and damage would rise once authorities can enter the smoldering remains. Military Police Gen. Julio Pineda said 11 were killed. More than 500 people were treated at hospitals, mostly for smoke inhalation.

Patricio Bustos, who directs the national forensics service, said DNA tests would be needed to identify some of the remains.

It was the worst fire to hit the picturesque seaside city of 250,000 people since 1953, when 50 people were killed and every structure was destroyed on several of the city's hills.

Even though the fires were contained to the hills, Bachelet declared the entire city a catastrophe zone, putting Chile's military in charge of maintaining order. “The people of Valparaiso have courage, have strength, and they aren't alone,” Bachelet said.

Valparaiso, which was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 2003, is known for colorful neighborhoods hugging hills so steep that people have to use staircases rather than streets. About 75 miles northwest of the capital, Santiago, it has a vibrant port and is home to Chile's national legislature.

But many homes in poorer areas above the city center have been built without water supplies or access points wide enough for firetrucks, so much of the fight was from the air.

While 1,250 firefighters, police and forest rangers battled the blaze, 2,000 Chilean sailors in combat gear patrolled streets to maintain order and prevent looting.

Shelters were overflowing.

Maria Elizabeth Diaz, eight months pregnant and trying to rest with her two sons in a shelter set up in Valparaiso's Greek School, said she had been hesitant to flee her home in Cerro Las Canas when she first learned that the hilltop above her was on fire.

“I didn't want to move because I was afraid they'd rob me, but I had to flee when I saw the fire was coming down the hill,” she said. “I lost everything. ”

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