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Russia shakes fist at Ukraine; visiting Biden warns against intervention

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By The Washington Post
Monday, April 21, 2014, 9:30 p.m.
 

MOSCOW — Russia warned on Monday that Ukraine's government is igniting a civil war in the eastern regions of the country, and it said Moscow is prepared to step in to stop it.

Ukrainian officials said Moscow has stepped in — and that is the problem. Mounting photographic evidence suggests Russian special forces have been active in eastern Ukraine for at least the past week, in support of pro-Russian militants.

And residents in the restive regions who are opposed to Russia were beginning to speak out against Moscow.

Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov's warning about Russian intervention was the most explicit declaration yet of his country's intentions toward eastern Ukraine. It was made as Vice President Joe Biden arrived in Kiev for a two-day visit to meet with political leaders, civil society groups and American diplomats.

Biden brought a commitment of economic assistance. He warned Russia that intervention in Ukraine's volatile east will bring new costs.

But the Russian threats held out the possibility that Moscow will be on the move — and soon.

“Those who are deliberately pursuing a civil war, in a possible attempt to start a big, serious, bloody conflict, are pursuing a criminal policy,” Lavrov said. “And we will not only condemn this policy, but will also stop it.”

A tentative agreement reached on Thursday in Geneva by Ukraine, Russia, the European Union and the United States has gained little traction. The armed pro-Russian forces in eastern Ukraine have not abandoned the buildings they have occupied, defying the pact.

Geoffrey Pyatt, the U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, said on Monday evening that Washington wants there to be movement under the accord in “days, not weeks.”

Lavrov, in contrast, lashed out at the Ukrainian government for “flagrantly” refusing to dismantle the protest camp in Kiev's Independence Square, known as the Maidan, nearly 350 miles west of the disputed regions. It was the epicenter of the months-long protest against now-ousted President Viktor Yanukovych. Lavrov demanded that it be dispersed at once as a prerequisite for further de-escalation.

On Sunday, three people were killed in a shootout in the eastern city of Slovyansk. Lavrov said the residents of the Donetsk region craved Russian protection.

“There has been a surge in appeals to Russia to save them from this outrage,” he said at a news conference, invoking a time-honored Russian rationale for military intervention in another country. “We are being put into an extremely complex position.”

As Russia shook its fist, citizens in eastern Ukraine who want to remain unified under a central government in Kiev began to publicly oppose the pro-Russian agitators.

In the port of Mariupol and the industrial city of Khartsyzk, residents staged some of the first “pro-unity” rallies in the area.

Protected by a low-key police presence, businessman Vyacheslav Redko stood before a crowd in front of the Soviet-era Palace of Culture in Khartsyzk and demanded that authorities take down the Russian flag flying above City Hall and remove the barricade of tires at the entrance.

“It is a myth that everyone here wants to join our big brother Russia,” Redko said. “But our side has not been heard, because people are scared or intimidated, or they assume they cannot win.”

Redko said he was surprised to see a few hundred of his neighbors at the rally. He would have been happy with a few dozen. “For Khartsyzk? This is a big deal,” he said.

Vladimir Ponomaryov, “the people's mayor” of Slovyansk, said self-defense militia members in the city have detained 20 people suspected of spying for Kiev. One of those was Ukrainian journalist and activist Irma Krat, who was shown on Russian TV blindfolded and being escorted by local militia members.

He said two bodies have been pulled from the river that runs through the city. The victims, members of the pro-Russian Donestk People's Republic, had been stabbed to death, he said. It was not possible to confirm the claim.

Biden, whose main meetings in Kiev are scheduled to take place on Tuesday, is the most senior Obama administration official to visit Ukraine since its crisis with Russia began two months ago.

Biden is expected to announce a technical support package aimed at boosting Ukraine's economy, energy sector and political reform efforts in the run-up to presidential and mayoral elections next month.

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