TribLIVE

| USWorld

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

200 injured in Seoul subway crash

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By The Associated Press
Friday, May 2, 2014, 5:24 p.m.
 

SEOUL — A subway train plowed into the back of another train at a station in South Korea's capital on Friday, injuring about 200, including about 150 who were hospitalized with bruises and other mostly minor injuries.

According to local media, there were long delays in providing instructions to passengers about what to do. That struck a nerve in South Korea, where the captain in an April 16 ferry sinking that killed hundreds has been condemned for waiting 30 minutes to issue an evacuation order as the ship sank.

A preliminary investigation suggested the train's automatic distance control system malfunctioned.

The driver of the moving train told officials that he applied the emergency brake after noticing a stop signal but wasn't able to halt in time, Seoul Metro official Jeong Su-young said.

Fire officer Kim Kyung-su said emergency officials arrived at the scene about two to three minutes after a passenger informed them of the accident.

Lee Dong-hyun, a passenger on the incoming train, described a chaotic scene after the crash. “It stopped suddenly ... and everyone screamed,” he said.

Lee said the door leading to the next car was crushed and couldn't be opened.

The accident comes as South Koreans are criticizing the government for lax safety practices that many feel contributed to the sinking of the ferry Sewol, which left more than 300 people, mostly high school students, dead or missing.

The subway accident received extensive media coverage and was the top news on television and social media sites.

“I was so surprised and wasn't sure what to do,” said Lim Seong-eun, 26, who commutes by subway every day.

Lim said her mother called her to tell her about the accident and ask if she was on the train.

“It's been less than one month since the Sewol disaster and I'm a little anxious that an accident like this happened in a place used by lots of people,” Lim said.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read World

  1. NATO proclaims ‘strong solidarity’ with Turkey against IS
  2. Israelis remember how summer conflict affected beach ritual
  3. U.S., Turkey plan for ‘safe zone’ free of ISIS in northern Syria
  4. Gunbattle kills 21 at Afghan wedding party
  5. China returns passport to artist Ai Weiwei, who plans London trip
  6. Defense secretary touts success of Kurdish fighters in war on ISIS
  7. Chinese woman crushed to death in escalator
  8. Obama knocks Huckabee, Trump for slide in Republican rhetoric
  9. Nigeria celebrates year without polio
  10. Saudis’ deadly airstrikes resume in Yemen
  11. Boehner vows to do ‘everything possible’ to scuttle Iran nuclear deal