TribLIVE

| USWorld

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Thai PM guilty, told to abandon her office

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By Reuters
Wednesday, May 7, 2014, 6:15 p.m.
 

BANGKOK — A Thai court ordered Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra to step down on Wednesday as a result of finding her guilty of abuse of power, prolonging a political crisis that has led to violent protests and brought the economy close to recession.

The decision is bound to anger supporters of Yingluck, but the court did allow ministers not implicated in the case against her to stay in office, a decision that could take some of the sting out of any backlash on the streets.

After the ruling, the cabinet said Commerce Minister Niwatthamrong Boonsongphaisan, who is also a deputy prime minister, would replace Yingluck, and the caretaker government would press ahead with plans for an election on July 20.

“The caretaker government's responsibility now is to organize an election as soon as possible,” said Niwatthamrong, a former executive in a company owned by Thaksin Shinawatra, Yingluck's brother and himself a former prime minister who was ousted by the military in 2006.

“I hope the political situation will not heat up after this,” Niwatthamrong said of the court ruling.

Thailand's protracted political crisis broadly pits Bangkok's middle class and royalist establishment against the mainly poor, rural supporters of Yingluck and Thaksin, who lives in exile to avoid a 2008 jail sentence for abuse of power.

Despite Yingluck's removal from power, there is no obvious end in sight to the turmoil in Thailand, with protesters opposed to Yingluck and her government still pushing for political reforms before new elections.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read World

  1. Comets hold life building blocks
  2. Senate to grill United Nations agency chief Amano on Iran nuclear pact
  3. Firebombing kills Palestinian toddler, wounds family; Jewish settlers blamed
  4. ISIS suspected in abduction of Indian citizens in Libya
  5. Experimental Ebola vaccine could stop virus in West Africa
  6. Dissension cracks Taliban leadership
  7. Turkey aims guns at Kurdish rebels
  8. WikiLeaks says U.S. spied on another ally: Japan
  9. Turkey joins fight against ISIS
  10. Defense secretary touts success of Kurdish fighters in war on ISIS
  11. Libyans on death sentences for Gadhafi’s son, others: ‘Who cares?’