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British PM's ex-aide will be tried again

| Monday, June 30, 2014, 6:57 p.m.
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LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 30: Andy Coulson arrives at at Old Bailey for a Re-Trial decision on phone hacking charges on June 30, 2014 in London, England. Andy Coulson, former editor of the News of the World, returns to court to find out whether he will face a retrial over two charges of conspiracy to bribe public officials. (Photo by Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images)

LONDON — British Prime Minister David Cameron's ex-media chief Andy Coulson, found guilty last week of phone-hacking while editing a Rupert Murdoch tabloid, will stand trial for a second time over alleged illegal payments, prosecutors said on Monday.

Coulson was convicted by a jury of being complicit in widespread tapping of voicemails by journalists at Murdoch's defunct News of the World Sunday tabloid after an eight-month trial.

However, the jury was unable to reach a verdict on whether Coulson and the paper's former royal editor, Clive Goodman, were guilty of making illegal payments to a police officer to obtain telephone directories for Britain's royal family. They denied the accusations.

Rebekah Brooks, the ex-chief executive of News Corp.'s British newspaper arm News International who was tried on phone-hacking allegations and other crimes, was cleared on all charges.

The announcement of the retrial was made as Coulson and three other senior journalists appeared in court for a sentencing hearing.

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