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Separatists lose faith in Russia

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By The Associated Press
Wednesday, July 9, 2014, 6:21 p.m.
 

DONETSK, Ukraine — A top figure in Ukraine's separatist insurgency said on Wednesday he is losing hope for action by Russian forces and blamed Russian tycoons for dissuading Moscow from military intervention.

Pavel Gubarev, the self-proclaimed governor of the rebel Donetsk People's Republic, also said there is a split in rebel ranks and his organization no longer controls the murky Vostok Battalion of fighters who man key checkpoints on the outskirts of the Donetsk region's capital city.

After Ukrainian forces drove separatists out of their stronghold city of Slovyansk over the weekend, Ukrainian officials said forces would aim for a blockade of Donetsk city.

At a news conference, Gubarev said: “We would like to receive help in the form of Russian forces. But we are realists and understand that's impossible.”

Rebels in the Donetsk region and the adjacent Luhansk region have repeatedly called for Russia to send in “peacekeeping” troops as the fight against them intensifies. Russia has shown no inclination to do so, and officials have said that a peacekeeping mission could take place only with U.N. authorization.

Gubarev suggested that Russian tycoons are opposed to military action, fearing their businesses would be affected. Russia already has been hit with Western sanctions for its annexation of Crimea from Ukraine in March and for allegedly fomenting the unrest in eastern Ukraine, in which more than 400 people have reportedly been killed. Sending forces into Ukraine would almost certainly prompt even harsher sanctions.

“Their selfish interests are understandable,” Gubarev said.

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