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China citizen charged by U.S. with hacking Boeing in industrial espionage scheme

| Saturday, July 12, 2014, 6:36 p.m.

A Chinese citizen has been charged with plotting to steal data from U.S. military contractors, including a successful hack of Boeing Co.'s computer system, amid an expanding crackdown on industrial espionage by China.

Su Bin, the owner of a Chinese aviation technology company with an office in Canada, conspired with two unidentified people in China to break into the computer networks of U.S. companies to get information related to military projects, according to charges unsealed last week in federal court in Los Angeles. Su advised the two others in China on what data to target, according to the charges.

Su's alleged co-conspirators claimed to have stolen 65 gigabytes of data from Boeing related to the C-17 military cargo plane, according to the criminal complaint. They allegedly sought data related to other aircraft, including Lockheed Martin Corp.'s F-22 and F-35 fighter jets.

Meanwhile, China's top newspaper published a commentary on Saturday saying that Beijing and Washington must avoid a “new cold war.”

China and the United States agreed on Thursday to boost military ties and counterterrorism cooperation during annual talks in Beijing, but there was little immediate sign of progress on thorny cyber-security or maritime issues.

“Both China and the United States realize that today's world has already undergone profound changes, and there is no longer a market for a ‘new cold war,' ” said the People's Daily commentary.

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