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Ebola viral disease prompts U.S. travel warning to West Africa

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By From Wire Reports
Friday, Aug. 1, 2014, 12:01 a.m.
 

American health officials on Thursday warned citizens not to travel to the three West African countries hit by an outbreak of Ebola.

The travel advisory applies to nonessential travel to Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, where the disease has killed more than 700 people this year.

“The bottom line is Ebola is worsening in West Africa,” said Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, who announced the travel warning.

He called Ebola “a tragic, dreadful and merciless virus.”

The purpose of the travel warning is not only to protect U.S. travelers, but to limit their use of overburdened clinics and hospitals for injuries or other illnesses, he said.

For more than a month, CDC has advised travelers simply to take precautions when in the outbreak region. The alert is the highest level. The World Health Organization, however, has not issued a similar travel warning for the West Africa region. The last time the CDC issued a high-level warning was in 2003 because of a SARS outbreak in Asia.

The current outbreak is the largest since the disease first emerged in Africa nearly 40 years ago. The virus is contagious and is spread by direct contact with blood or bodily fluids from a sick person. Ebola can't be spread like flu through casual contact or breathing in the same air.

Experts estimate that in this outbreak, about 60 percent of the people who have gotten sick with Ebola have died — a frightening fatality rate that is among the highest of any disease. There is no vaccine and no specific treatment for it.

Two American aid workers in Liberia have been diagnosed with Ebola, and one of them was getting an experimental treatment.

At the White House, press secretary Josh Earnest said the United States is looking into options to bring them back. While the U.S. would facilitate the trip, private companies would be used to transport them.

Earnest said that type of response would be consistent with how the U.S. handled other situations, including the SARS outbreak, and the goal would be to ensure Americans can benefit from treatment in the U.S.

The CDC has about two dozen staffers in West Africa to help try to control the outbreak. Frieden said on Thursday that the CDC will send 50 more in the next month. CDC workers in Africa also are working at airports to help screen passengers, he said.

The CDC has said that the risk of the Ebola virus' coming to the United States remains small.

 

 
 


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