TribLIVE

| USWorld

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

After 4 attempts, forensics experts finally make it to Ukraine plane crash site

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By The Washington Post
Thursday, July 31, 2014, 6:51 p.m.
 

KIEV, Ukraine — A small advance team of forensics experts on Thursday finally reached the site where a Malaysia Airlines flight went down in eastern Ukraine two weeks ago after four days of false starts cut short by heavy fighting in the area.

The team recovered DNA samples from 25 victims and personal items belonging to 27 victims, all of which had been kept in a morgue in the rebel-held city of Donetsk before being handed over to the Dutch-led team.

It took seven hours for the team of two Australian and two Dutch experts, accompanied by monitors with the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, to drive 123 miles to what they call the chicken farm area where the plane's wings and landing gear fell to earth. They were delayed at Ukrainian checkpoints waiting for a cease-fire to take effect and at rebel checkpoints negotiating their advance, said Pieter-Jaap Aalbersberg, the head of the recovery mission.

In the end, they spent barely an hour at the site. But they hope to return on Friday with a larger squad to look for body parts and possessions in more locations around the wide debris field. Eventually, they may use sniffer dogs.

The area the wreckage fell may still hold the remains of as many as 80 people among the 298 aboard Flight 17 when it was shot down July 17 by a missile apparently fired from separatist-held territory, Australian Foreign Minister Julie Bishop said.

Though the advance squad was small, their visit marked a breakthrough. For four consecutive days, they had been turned back by warnings of heavy fighting, as presidents, prime ministers and international organizations pleaded for Ukrainian and separatist forces to observe a cease-fire around the crash site.

Meanwhile, in Kiev, the government pulled out of a crisis when it voted not to accept the resignation of Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk. He said he was stepping down last week, in what is viewed as an ultimatum designed to force parliament to vote on an economic package.

Parliament's rejection of his resignation is considered a victory for the reforms Yatsenyuk championed. Though officially in recess, the legislature returned for a one-day session on Thursday and adopted changes that were in line with what the International Monetary Fund was seeking.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read World

  1. ISIS suspected in abduction of Indian citizens in Libya
  2. Firebombing kills Palestinian toddler, wounds family; Jewish settlers blamed
  3. Dissension cracks Taliban leadership
  4. Experimental Ebola vaccine could stop virus in West Africa
  5. WikiLeaks says U.S. spied on another ally: Japan
  6. Defense secretary touts success of Kurdish fighters in war on ISIS
  7. Scientists warn about killer robots
  8. India hangs man who raised funds in support of 1993’s deadly Mumbai bombings