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Layton Bridge to close for filming

The Layton Bridge in Perry Township is closed today for the filming of a television pilot.

The series, titled "Fire in the Hole," centers on a short story by Elmore Leonard, who has written numerous stories, mostly about small towns, that have been made into movies. Shawn Boyachek is location manager for the show.

Boyachek said the television pilot will be about Harlan, Ky., which is a coal-mining town.

The phrase "fire in the hole" comes from mining. Miners would warn their fellow workers that a charge had been set. The production is a Sony product and will be shown on the FX channel.

A few local actors will be featured in the production, Boyachek said.

Most of the filming will take place at night, though the bridge was closed at 6 a.m. today and a small daytime scene was filmed. The bridge will remain closed until noon Thursday.

The village of Layton is not unfamiliar to the glamour of Hollywood. Portions of the famous movie "Silence of the Lambs" were filmed in a house in Layton. The family who owned the house at the time of the filming still lives there.

The bridge is located in Fayette County, and carries Layton Road over the Youghiogheny River.

PennDOT District 12 said detours are posted, and motorists are urged to use them.

Detours are Route 1002 (Banning Layton Road/Dawson Road), Route 1041 (Cunningham School Road), Route 819, Route 1010 (Front Street/Dickerson Run Road), Route 201, and Route 4017 (Cemetery Road).

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