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Carnegie Library toasts newest chapter

"You know champagne; it's the drink that makes you see double ... and feel single!" laughed Dan Booker with wife, Debbie .

And with that, glasses were in the air as we joined co-chairs Dr. John and Jacqui Lazo and more than 200 in a toast to christen the newest chapter of the Carnegie Library, East Liberty, on Friday, which re-opened its doors following a 15-month, $5.6 million renovation.

Now, this is what we call a face-lift; the entire space looks as though 30 years were shaved off the shelves; a light, bright interior, 9-thousand-square-foot addition to the building, and 150,000 treasures that make up the lower level Heritage Collection.

CLP prexy Dr. Barbara Mistick, Ralph Papa, Elliott Oshry, Dee Jay Oshry , and Diane Holder were among those lauding this $505K lunch break, but it was the announcement that CLP's Capital Campaign stood at $57 million that had us uncorking yet another bottle of bubbly. (Here's your history lesson for the day; contrary to popular belief, our dear Andrew Carnegie did not provide an endowment for the libraries that bear his name ... just one more reason to support your local libraries).

"We brought our 3-year-old here last Saturday for the soft opening," mused architect Anne Chen . "He loved it! He threw a temper tantrum when it was time to leave."

We felt the same way.

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