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Campaign cash flows for Ravenstahl, Onorato

The campaign cash keeps rolling in for Allegheny County Executive Dan Onorato and Pittsburgh Mayor Luke Ravenstahl.

Onorato banked $71,250 and Ravenstahl raised $17,000 since filing reports Friday with the Allegheny County Elections Division.

Candidates are required to report within 24 hours donations of $500 or larger received between the filing deadline and the May 19 primary.

Onorato isn't officially in a race this year, but is widely viewed as a likely gubernatorial candidate in 2010, Gov. Ed Rendell's final year in office.

Ravenstahl is running for re-election against Councilman Patrick Dowd and attorney Carmen Robinson.

The largest last-minute contribution to Ravenstahl is $15,000 from three executives of The Forza Group, a real estate company that arranged to meet with city planning officials to discuss building at least one hotel in Pittsburgh.

Planning Director Noor Ismail declined to discuss details of the project because the company hasn't applied for approval.

Ravenstahl said he wasn't familiar with the firm. The donation pushes Ravenstahl's total cash and in-kind contributions to $357,000 this year, including a $150,000 loan from Onorato.

Onorato raised about $520,000 this year, pushing his account well above $4.5 million.

Dowd reported $6,500 in additional donations. He raised about $124,500 this year, less than half of what Ravenstahl has received.

Robinson, who missed the Friday deadline, filed a report Monday saying she raised about $23,300 from in-kind and cash donations. She gave $4,700 to her campaign, the largest contribution reported.

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