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Newsmaker: Suzanne E. Miller

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Wednesday, Aug. 10, 2011
 

Noteworthy: The University of Oxford will publish Miller's peer-reviewed paper describing the results of her study she created involving the use of contemporary and classic children's books to help students distinguish between leaders and bullies. In March, she presented her findings to academics from around the world who have a special interest in the nature of children's literature.

Age: 67

Residence: Ross

Occupation: Professor of education, Point Park University.

Education: Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Bachelor of Arts in business education; Penn State University, Master of Science in curriculum & instruction; Duquesne University, doctorate in educational leadership.

Quote: "With so much emphasis in the schools now on trying to instill more civility and combating bullying, contemporary, student-selected literature is a great resource for teaching children respect for one another and providing them with the necessary foundation for getting along in society. ... The experience for the student and the teacher can be so much more beneficial and pleasurable when they work collaboratively using highly popular, self-selected and relevant books for the individual student."

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