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Sewickley woman accused in wine, sex case

Police charged a former dance and theater teacher at a Homestead school with giving alcohol to students at her house and urging them to have sex with her.

Cassandra Sproch, 42, of Sewickley is charged with corruption of minors, endangering the welfare of children, indecent assault, unlawful contact with a minor and furnishing liquor to minors.

A phone number for Sproch was disconnected, and no one answered the door at her home Wednesday. Court records did not list an attorney.

Sproch worked at Propel Homestead K-8 campus as a part-time contracted dance and theater instructor. Her contract was terminated in mid-November, said Jeremy Resnick, Propel's executive director. Resnick declined to say what led to her termination. Sproch formerly owned the Sewickley School of Performing Arts, which closed in 2007.

Sproch's 14-year-old son told Allegheny County police detectives he was at his mother's Beaver Road home Nov. 15 when she arrived with three students, ages 13, 15 and 16, according to a police affidavit.

Sproch eventually began making dinner, poured each child a glass of wine and "encouraged them to drink," the affidavit states.

The boys told police Sproch got drunk and began "acting crazy." When the teens went into another room to play video games, she called the 15-year-old boy upstairs, police said, touched him and offered to have sex with him.

The boy refused and went back downstairs. After "continued requests" by Sproch, the 16-year-old boy went upstairs. The other two boys followed and found Sproch and the boy in her bedroom, where Sproch was kissing him and had him "pinned against the bedroom wall," police reported.

Sproch's son and the other boy dragged the 16-year-old from the room and the teens left the home, the affidavit states. The 15-year-old later told investigators Sproch took him to a restaurant in Homestead in early November and "began kissing on his neck and offered him sex."

Sproch was arraigned Monday.

A federal judge last month sentenced Sproch, also known as Sproch-Guggenheimer, to five years of probation with five months of house arrest for fraudulently obtaining credit cards in another person's name and using them to purchase goods and services. Sproch was ordered to pay $15,524 in restitution.

Court records show financial liens against Sproch. Her estranged husband filed a protection-from-abuse order against her Nov. 18, saying he "fears for the safety" of their son.

In the petition, Gregor Guggenheimer said his estranged wife "frequently abuses alcohol, becomes volatile and routinely engages in inappropriate corporal punishment" against their son.

A judge granted Guggenheimer the order, pending a January hearing, and gave him temporary custody of his son. Guggenheimer could not be reached.

The couple, who filed for divorce in 2006, filed for several protection orders against each other during the past 14 years, court records show.

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