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Seton Hill receives $3.5M in bequest

Seton Hill University has received the single largest legacy gift in its history, $3.5 million, which university officials said would be used to create an endowed scholarship fund for minority students.

Carol Ann Reichgut, who died Jan. 8, graduated from the Greensburg school in 1956. She lived in Silver Spring, Md., and taught music in the Montgomery County, Md., school system for 35 years, university officials said. She earned a master's degree in music from Columbia University in 1963.

"Generations of Seton Hill University students will be supported by her extraordinary gift," JoAnne Boyle, president of the university, said in a news release. "The magnitude of this bequest underscores how private gifts and grants help colleges in the independent sector provide superior educational opportunities to students of modest means."

The bequest from Reichgut's estate brings Seton Hill's endowment and capital campaign drive to $80 million.

The university announced it would name the concert hall in the Performing Arts Center in downtown Greensburg in Reichgut's honor.

"Carol Reichgut was a cherished and dedicated friend to her alma mater for 53 years," Boyle said.

Christine Mueseler, the school's vice president for Institutional Advancement and Marketing, said Reichgut "provided over $50,000 in scholarships each year so that students would be able to experience an exceptional education at her alma mater. "

In 2001, Seton Hill honored Reichgut with the Distinguished Alumna Leadership Award.

"She is a beloved alumna who is dearly missed and to whom we will be forever grateful," Mueseler said.

Additional Information:

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Seton Hill University Web site

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