Share This Page

Longtime Pittsburgh radio voice Hoerth dead at 66

Longtime talk-radio personality Doug Hoerth was found dead in his Bellevue home last night.

The Allegheny County Medical Examiner's Office said a friend grew concerned when the former WPTT talk show host wasn't seen earlier in the day, and called authorities. Police showed up to his home on South Fremont Avenue just before 8 p.m. and discovered him dead inside.

A cause of death will not be known until an autopsy is performed, but the medical examiner's office says it doesn't appear Hoerth, 66, suffered any trauma.

Hoerth began his radio career in the 1970s at WFTL in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on a lark. He called the station one night when its talk show host was interviewing the program director.

At the time, he was a partner in a pest-control business. The station hired him to do a gig on the show as a publicity stunt, and six months later Hoerth sold his share of the bug-busting business and became a disc jockey.

Hoerth came to Pittsburgh in 1980. In addition to WPTT and WTAE, he has worked at KQV, KDKA, WWSW and WTKN. His last day on the air was Dec. 7, 2007.

In a statement, Alan Serena, vice president for operations at Renda Broadcasting in Green Tree, said Hoerth knew so much about many different topics.

“His WPTT afternoon shows were entertaining and not what you typically expected to hear on a talk station. From politics to pro wrestling to porn stars, Doug was as well versed as he was diverse in his subject matter,” Serena wrote. “His passion was music, especially the oldies he played Sunday nights on WJAS. He was a unique individual. Off air he was a quiet, reclusive person. News of his sudden passing was sad. I know a lot of Pittsburghers hope they get a chance to say their final farewells to a broadcasting legend.”

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.