TribLIVE

| News

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Climate lies

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Letters home ...

Traveling abroad for personal, educational or professional reasons?

Why not share your impressions — and those of residents of foreign countries about the United States — with Trib readers in 150 words?

The world's a big place. Bring it home with Letters Home.

Contact Colin McNickle (412-320-7836 or cmcnickle@tribweb.com).

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

Thursday, Sept. 24, 2009
 

The first casualty of "climate change" rhetoric continues to be the truth.

Take, for instance, President Obama's speech to the United Nations on Tuesday. Myron Ebell, the noted director of energy and global warming policy at the Competitive Enterprise Institute, documents at least four misrepresentations:

• The president said the threat is "serious," "urgent" and "growing." But Mr. Ebell notes that global mean temperatures increased only slightly from 1977 to 2000 and have been "flat" since then.

• Obama: "Rising sea levels threaten every coastline." Not so, says Ebell -- "(S)ea levels have been rising on and off since the end of the last Ice Age 13,000 years ago. The rate ... has not increased in recent decades over the 19th- and 20th-century average."

• Storms and floods are "more powerful" and "threaten every continent," said Mr. Obama. Ebell: "(T)here is no upward global trend in storms or floods."

• Obama: "More frequent drought and crop failures" are exacerbating hunger and conflict where they already thrive. But Ebell says that's simply false.

To paraphrase 19th-century French economist Frederic Bastiat, "climate change" theologians need only a few words to set forth their half-truths whereas opponents are forced to resort to long and arid dissertations to expose their lies.

This is the sad state of the global warming debate. Much sadder is that the president of the United States is engaged in such misrepresentations.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read News