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Tuesday takes

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Letters home ...

Traveling abroad for personal, educational or professional reasons?

Why not share your impressions — and those of residents of foreign countries about the United States — with Trib readers in 150 words?

The world's a big place. Bring it home with Letters Home.

Contact Colin McNickle (412-320-7836 or cmcnickle@tribweb.com).

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2009
 

At it again: The same Toledo, Ohio, Block Bugler that once chided Jesse Helms for saying "no" to communism is back with another warped classic. A Bugler editorial calls conservatives critical of President Obama being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize "a motley crew," then equates them with the Taliban. So, does the Democratic National Committee text or Twitter its instructions to publisher John Robinson Block's home or office?

Complex mess: A dubious bond deal inked by the Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority has come back to haunt. Part of a complex, $414 million debt swap deal lost credit guarantees. The interest rate has nearly doubled at a cost of $230,000 a week. If the authority can secure new guarantees, the rate will drop. But at least one rating agency already has issued a "negative outlook" on the debt. The lesson here -- simpler is better.

Countdown to closure? : The phrase "belly up" is being whispered about the future of Pittsburgh International Airport. Flight and passenger volume is down and costs and fees are rising dramatically. It's a sad object lesson in the fallacy of the public underwriting of US Airways, for which taxpayers built a new airport more than a decade ago.

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