TribLIVE

| News

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

State of the Union: Obama lied

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Letters home ...

Traveling abroad for personal, educational or professional reasons?

Why not share your impressions — and those of residents of foreign countries about the United States — with Trib readers in 150 words?

The world's a big place. Bring it home with Letters Home.

Contact Colin McNickle (412-320-7836 or cmcnickle@tribweb.com).

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

Sunday, Jan. 31, 2010
 

The first casualty of political rhetoric always is the truth.

Witness President Barack Obama's contention in last week's State of the Union Address that the recent Supreme Court ruling on campaign finance -- allowing corporations and unions to underwrite political ads -- "reversed a century of law."

And that it "opened the floodgates ... (for) foreign companies to spend without limit in our elections."

But the ruling did no such thing. And, worse, the error was so blatant that it cannot be dismissed as some kind of "inadvertent mischaracterization" spoken off the cuff; it was part of the president's prepared text.

Given that Mr. Obama's top White House lawyer is a seasoned campaign-finance attorney, former Justice Department attorney Shannen Coffin, writing in National Review Online, finds it hard to believe that lie was anything but intentional.

No wonder Associate Justice Sam Alito shook his head and appeared to mouth the words, "That's not true."

Nineteenth-century French political economist Frederic Bastiat reminded that only a few words are needed to set forth a half-truth "whereas, in order to show that it is a half-truth, we have to resort to long and arid dissertations."

To borrow Obama's own words, "No wonder there's so much cynicism out there."

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Stories

  1. Pirates acquire pitcher Blanton from Royals for cash
  2. Starkey: Garoppolo baffles Steelers
  3. McCutchen, Pirates cruise to interleague victory over Twins
  4. Peduto blasts Wolf’s plan to borrow $3B to shore up pensions
  5. Tight ends’ role in Steelers passing game continues to lessen but players remain selfless
  6. Steelers notebook: LB Dupree sits out backs-on–backers drill
  7. Steelers’ Bell unsure why NFL reduced his suspension
  8. Inside the Steelers: Williams’ quickness out of backfield evident in drills
  9. Quaker Valley grad chips in for Penn State baseball, named summer league all-star
  10. Pirates notebook: Melancon bails out Watson with extended outing
  11. Plum High School teacher held for court on charges of intimidation