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The Thursday wrap

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Letters home ...

Traveling abroad for personal, educational or professional reasons?

Why not share your impressions — and those of residents of foreign countries about the United States — with Trib readers in 150 words?

The world's a big place. Bring it home with Letters Home.

Contact Colin McNickle (412-320-7836 or cmcnickle@tribweb.com).

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

Thursday, Feb. 17, 2011
 

Revolt of the Light Brigade: Freedom Action has begun a petition drive to have Congress rescind what effectively is a ban on incandescent light bulbs. The group is an offshoot of the Competitive Enterprise Institute. It cites not only the congressional overreach but the mercury danger of compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs). Sans that, can a black market in incandescents be far behind?

Muffling the voucher whine: Despite all the gnashing of teeth of more than a few public school officials over vouchers for low-income students -- namely, how it will supposedly financially strap their districts -- the Commonwealth Foundation's Nathan Benefield reminds there "has never been a single study demonstrating that scholarships have a negative impact on school performance or their ability to raise funds." So, what will the educratic establishment's next excuse be?

A shocking conviction: An Austrian court has convicted a young Viennese mother commenting negatively about Islam in a lecture before a political gathering. The Hudson Institute's Nina Shea says Elisabeth Sabaditsch-Wolff was fined 480 euros. She was convicted of "blasphemy" but was not charged with "hate speech" because of Austria's free-speech guarantees. Which, of course, turns the concept of "free speech" on its head.

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