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Net neutrality' Try liberal bias

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Tuesday, June 14, 2011
 

Federal Communications Commission documents confirm that the supposedly independent agency is anything but neutral on so-called "net neutrality."

The damning paper trail -- obtained by Judicial Watch via the Freedom of Information Act -- begins after March 2009, when President Obama's "Democrat appointees solidified their 3-2 control of the agency," The Washington Times reports.

It shows coordination with the far-left group Free Press, which opposes faster Internet service for those willing to pay for it.

Free Press, partially funded by far-left billionaire George Soros, was founded by a Marxist journal's editor and a contributor to the leftist "flagship" The Nation, and advocates expanding government control.

The FCC is so committed to that agenda that it voted to impose net-neutrality rules despite a federal appellate court's ruling that it lacks authority to regulate the Internet.

Net neutrality "would be akin to forcing FedEx and UPS to treat all packages the same way the U.S. Postal Service does," writes The Times' Conn Carroll. And it's the first step toward government regulating online content, too.

Regarding free speech and free markets, and its legally required impartiality, the Obama FCC is -- in Internet parlance -- an "epic fail."

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