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Where are they now'

College Football Videos

By The The Tribune-Review
Sunday, Aug. 27, 2006
 

JOHN MAJORS, Head coach

Many people think of Majors only as the longtime college coach who guided Pitt to the 1976 national championship. But did you know he was an All-American running back at Tennessee, where he also coached for many years and finished as runner-up to Paul Hornung of Notre Dame for the 1956 Heisman Trophy?

Majors is fondly remembered at Pitt for his iconic stature, even though his eight-year record at the school stands at 45-45-1. In turn, he fondly recalls his time with the Panthers, which included two stretches (1973-76, 1993-96). In between, he experienced a very successful 16-year run at Tennessee that produced three Southeastern Conference championships before a heart attack in 1992 forced his departure.

Majors lives not far from the Pitt campus in Oakland and serves as a special assistant to Chancellor Mark Nordenberg and athletic director Jeff Long.

TOM BRZOZA, Offensive guard

Brzoza made the move from guard to center and became an All-American in 1977. He became a starter in the fourth game of his freshman year and held the position for the rest of his career at Pitt.

He has stayed out of the spotlight since his playing days -- he says he prefers it that way -- living alone in a remote area of central Pennsylvania, 45 miles east of State College. The New Castle native works as a sales representative for an Allentown-based outdoor sports equipment company.

MATT CAVANAUGH, Quarterback

First, it was the national championship at Pitt, where Cavanaugh, currently the Panthers' offensive coordinator, was named MVP after quarterbacking Pitt to a 27-3 Sugar Bowl victory over Georgia. Then, there were the three Super Bowl rings -- one each as a backup with the San Francisco 49ers and New York Giants and one as an assistant with the Baltimore Ravens.

Though Cavanaugh, a Youngstown, Ohio, native, struggled with injuries in 1976 and 1977, he is remembered for helping to vault Pitt to a No. 1 ranking at the end of his junior year.

JIM CRAMER, Linebacker

Known simply as "Jimbo," perhaps Cramer should have been referred to by something a bit more ferocious. The Jefferson native, who works in medical sales for Bausch & Lomb, was a rugged player who endured two seasons under legendary strong-armed coach Woody Hayes at Ohio State before returning home to play for Pitt. He took pride in not being pushed around, and his speed, strength and quickness earned him a reputation as a no-nonsense defender.

TONY DORSETT, Running back

Perhaps the best-known Pitt football player of all-time was Dorsett, the electric runner from Hopewell who won the Heisman Trophy, the Maxwell Award and the Walter Camp Award following the Panthers' 1976 championship season. He finished his college career with a then-record 6,082 career rushing yards but figures he should have had at least one more had he not been ejected in the final minute of a 24-16 victory over backyard rival West Virginia.

Dorsett, who is married and lives in Frisco, Texas, has four children, including former NFL defensive back Anthony. He keeps busy as owner of Tony Dorsett Food Products and as a motivational speaker for Roger Staubach's sports-celebrity marketing company.

GORDON JONES, Wide receiver

Rather than take credit for his contributions, Jones points to the Pitt coaching staff for assembling what he refers to as "the ultimate team." Everything, he said, was synchronized.

Jones, a physical therapist in the Tampa Bay area, is regarded as Pitt's first great receiver of the modern era. He earned All-America honors as a senior in 1978 and finished his college career as the Panthers' all-time receiving yardage leader with 2,230 yards. His nickname, "Too Much," resulted from his ability to escape swarms of defenders and the manner in which he made seemingly impossible catches.

BOB JURY, Defensive back

An All-American in 1977 and the unquestioned leader of the Pitt secondary, Jury, a South Park native who is a food distribution salesman and assistant high school coach at Hempfield, holds school records for career interceptions (21), including two in a 34-3 victory over Clemson in the 1977 Gator Bowl; interceptions in a season (10); and career interception return yards (266). He played in the Hula and Japan bowls before an NFL stint with the San Francisco 49ers.

CARSON LONG, Kicker

When Long, who had just set a Pennsylvania high school record for the longest field goal in the state, visited Pitt for the first time, he found a warm, considerate man in coach John Majors. Four years later, the Panthers were on top of the college football world.

Long, a former high school coach at Cardinal Brennan and Mt. Carmel, currently works with the mentally retarded.

JOHN PELUSI, Center

Pelusi, a member of the Pitt Board of Trustees, was one of three brothers to play for the Panthers. His son, John Jr., is a sophomore tight end. John Sr., a Youngstown, Ohio, native who lives in Allison Park and is owner of a commercial real estate firm, recalls that Pitt "was so bad we snuck up on people," referring to the turnaround that occurred during coach John Major's first stint with the school.

AL ROMANO, Middle guard

In 1976, not only was Romano an All-American, he was widely regarded as the best nose guard in the country. He was strong, quick and blessed with tremendous instincts. Romano, a three-year starter, was picked as the most outstanding lineman in the Panthers' 33-19 victory over Kansas in the 1975 Sun Bowl.

Romano is the owner of a modular housing firm, in Syracuse, N.Y., where he was raised.

TOM YEWCIC, Quarterback

With Robert Haygood and Matt Cavanaugh sidelined with injuries during the season, the Panthers found themselves in a precarious situation at quarterback. But Yewcic, a Johnstown native, rescued them, stepping into the fire during the Panthers' 27-6 victory over Louisville that ran their record to 5-0.

He is a Democratic state representative from Cambria County.

- By Dave Mackall

1976 Pitt Roster
Name
Pos.
Class
Wayne Adams
QB
So.
Joel Anderson
DB
Sr.
Ken Anderson
MG
Fr.
Gary Arcuri
RB
Sr.
Mike Balzer
DB
So.
Allen Barboza
DE/TE
Fr.
Randy Bentley
QB
Fr.
Chuck Bonasorte
DE
Sr.
Ron Boone
DE
Fr.
Art Bortnick
OG
Jr.
Kurt Brechbill
OT
Fr.
Ed Brosky
RB
Sr.
Art Brown
DE
Sr.
Walt Brown
DT
So.
Tom Brzoza
OG
Jr.
David Bucklew
DE
Fr.
Jim Buoy
OG
Jr.
Matt Carroll
OG
So.
Matt Cavanaugh
QB
Jr.
Jim Chapin
LB
Jr.
Al Chesley
LB
So.
Steve Clemons
LB
So.
Willie Collier
DB/RB
Fr.
Rich Cooper
TE
Fr.
Jim Corbett
TE
Sr.
Jim Cramer
LB
Sr.
Ken Dapp
WR
Jr.
Jeff Delaney
DB
So.
Mike DeLisio
DB
So.
Rocky DeStefano
OG
So.
Dave DiCiccio
DB
So.
Tony Dorsett
RB
Sr.
John Falvo
HB/LB
Fr.
Leroy Felder
DB
Jr.
Larry Felton
DB
Sr.
Ed Gallagher
DT
So.
Steve Gaustad
DB/TE
So.
Bob Gruber
TE/DE
Fr.
John Hanhauser
OT
Sr.
Steve Harris
RB
Fr.
Scott Hartman
DT
So.
JoJo Heath
RB
Fr.
Bob Hightower
DB/HB
Fr.
Jim Hissom
LB
Sr.
Randy Holloway
DT
Jr.
Bob Hulton
RB
Sr.
Woody Jackson
QB
Fr.
Fred Jacobs
RB
Fr.
Paul Janov
WR/DB
Fr.
Cecil Johnson
DE
Sr.
Randy Johnson
DE/LB
Fr.
Gordon Jones
WR
So.
Bob Jury
DB
Jr.
Ray Kemp
RB
Fr.
Tom Kornick
K
Fr.
Kurt Kovach
DE
Sr.
Mike Lenosky
LB
So.
George Link
OG
Jr.
Mike Linn
LB/OG
Fr.
David Logan
MG
So.
Carson Long
K
Sr.
Rich Lucente
MG
Jr.
Tim Madison
DE
Fr.
Willie Marsh
DB
Jr.
Jeff Matthews
OG
Jr.
Scott McKeel
RB/DB
Fr.
Ron Medley
WR
Sr.
George Messich
OT
Sr.
Dave Migliore
QB
Sr.
Jim Morsillo
DT
So.
Dan Noble
LB
Jr.
George O'Korn
DB
Jr.
Mark O'Toole
DB
Jr.
Bernardo Paez
DB
Sr.
Al Papsy
C
So.
Don Parrish
DT
Sr.
Jeff Pelusi
LB
Fr.
John Pelusi
C
Sr.
Steve Pritchard
DT
So.
Mike Prokopovich
DB
Sr.
Bob Rechichar
RB
Fr.
Randy Reutershan
WR
Jr.
Desmond Robinson
DE
So.
Al Romano
MG
Sr.
Mark Schubert
K
So.

 

 
 


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