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Recruit gives Pitt a check

Highly touted tailback LeSean McCoy, at the center of a recruiting battle between Pitt and Penn State, might have tipped his hand Saturday night.

When McCoy entered Petersen Events Center for the Pitt-Georgetown basketball game, a student awaited with a hand-made sign with check marks filling boxes next to the names of committed recruits Pat Bostick, Dom DeCicco, Chris Jacobson and Henry Hynoski.

The box next to McCoy's name was empty, but to the cheers of the Oakland Zoo, Pitt's student section, he stopped to check it. McCoy then signed autographs.

"I've been blown away by it," McCoy said of the student response during his official visit. "I never expected it to be like this. I didn't know the fans were crazy like this. I didn't know it would be this tremendous."

The 6-foot, 205-pound tailback from Milford Academy in New Berlin, N.Y., who played at Harrisburg's Bishop McDevitt High School, said he might make his college choice this week.

"I don't want to say right now," McCoy said, "but I like Pitt a lot."

Panthers hire DB coach

Pitt announced the hiring of Chris Ball as its secondary coach. Ball spent the past four seasons at Alabama, which ranked among the nation's best defenses.

Ball also has coached at, among others, Washington State, Idaho State and Akron.

"In Chris Ball, we have added an exceptional football coach and recruiter," Pitt coach Dave Wannstedt said. "Chris has been an integral part of some of the top defenses in the country. We expect his experience and knowledge to be a major asset for our program."

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