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Retirement isn't in plans for Pens' Guerin

Penguins/NHL Videos

Monday, June 15, 2009
 

Looking years younger after shaving off his salt-and-pepper playoff beard, Penguins right wing Bill Guerin bristled at suggestions that winning the Stanley Cup might be the perfect way to retire.

"Yeah, I'm going to keep playing," Guerin, 38, said Sunday. "It'd be a great way to go out, but maybe I can do it in a couple years. I feel like I've got a lot of gas left in the tank. I feel I performed well. It doesn't matter what my age is. I feel good physically and mentally and I still love to play, so I'm going to keep playing."

Guerin was acquired from the N.Y. Islanders in March for a 2009 conditional draft choice, which was upgraded from fifth round to third round by the Penguins' playoff run. Guerin said he will move his family from Long Island if he re-signs with the Penguins.

"We wouldn't live separately again. It's too long and it's too hard," Guerin said. "That's something my wife and I are going to have to talk about and see what our options are and go from there."

Shake on it

Sidney Crosby said he didn't intentionally leave Detroit captain Nicklas Lidstrom and other Red Wings at center ice for the traditional post-game handshake after the conclusion of the Stanley Cup Final.

And the Penguins' star center and captain isn't about to apologize.

"I don't really need to talk to anyone from Detroit about it," Crosby said. "I made the attempt to go shake hands. I've been on that side of things, too. I know it's not easy waiting around. I just won the Stanley Cup. I think I have the right to celebrate with my teammates."

Red Wings alternate captain Kris Draper was critical of Crosby afterward, telling the Associated Press: "That's ridiculous, especially as their captain, and make sure you write that I said that!"

Crosby said he can sympathize with the Red Wings' frustration, especially after watching Detroit celebrate winning the Cup at Mellon Arena last year.

"I understand if they don't feel like waiting around. But you know what• It's the easiest thing to do in the world, to shake hands after you win," Crosby said. "I had no intentions of trying to skip guys and not shake their hands. I think that was a pretty unreasonable comment."

Kneed-to-know basis

Crosby said he took "numbing" agents to try to reduce the pain in his left knee after it was injured in the second period of Game 7, but "had a good idea" that he wasn't going to be able to play at full speed.

He knew for certain after taking a 35-second shift in the third period.

"Until I got out there and played a shift, I probably wouldn't have been satisfied in my mind with whether or not I was able to," Crosby said, "so once I got out there, within 10 seconds, I knew I couldn't really turn or stop that much."

Crosby said he was evaluated by a doctor yesterday morning and told that a magnetic resonance imaging test wasn't necessary.

"It should be a few weeks and it should be all right," he said.

Kodak moment

Penguins center Evgeni Malkin, a Hart Trophy finalist and the Conn Smythe Trophy winner as playoffs MVP, called winning the Stanley Cup "my dream" and said he feels "awesome now."

Even if lifting it was harder than he expected.

"It's very heavy," Malkin said. "It's 35 pounds. So heavy."

Malkin said he took the Conn Smythe Trophy home, where he took pictures of it with his parents, who didn't make the trip to Detroit for Game 7.

"Of course, they were happy," Malkin said. "It was a big moment

What pressure?

Penguins coach Dan Bylsma chuckled when asked about facing the pressure to repeat as Stanley Cup champions, instead calling it a "glorious opportunity."

"Just so I can get this straight, you're telling me it's a bad thing to have to repeat?" Bylsma responded. "It's pressure, but something I don't put a lot of stock in. What an opportunity to see if we can get back to the foundation and try to do this again. Only one team a year gets that opportunity, and we're going to try to have it next year. The challenge about it is you have to start over again. You don't get to start on June 13 and say, 'We're the best team.'

"That mentality might be the hardest thing to get back."

Listen up

For Penguins fans interested in listening to Mike Lange's call of Game 7 of the Stanley Cup Final, 105.9 The X will re-broadcast the game at 6 p.m. today.

Walking wounded

As had been previously reported in the Tribune-Review that Penguins defenseman Sergei Gonchar played the final two rounds of the Stanley Cup playoffs with a torn medial collateral ligament after absorbing a knee-to-knee hit from Washington's Alex Ovechkin in the second round.

Quotable

"My wife already yelled at me this morning for all the superstitions as we got towards the end. I'm a guy that doesn't have superstitions. I just like to do the same thing over and over again, especially when you win, but I don't need to go to Qdoba every day next year." — Bylsma, on his superstition of eating a burrito on game days.

 

 

 
 


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