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Steelers center Pouncey having a busy week

Not that center Maurkice Pouncey received a pass from coach Mike Tomlin, but if any Steeler had reason to be sluggish Wednesday, it was him.

The second-year veteran already has had a whirlwind week, highlighted Monday by the birth of his first child, a daughter named Jayda.

"Eight pounds, seven ounces," Pouncey said proudly. "I'm so happy."

Pouncey's Sunday went something like this: Start against the Tennessee Titans, leave with a right knee injury, return to the game, leave with a couple of minutes left in the fourth quarter to shower and catch a ride to the airport, fly to Orlando, Fla., and then play the waiting game.

Pouncey's girlfriend was supposed to give birth that day, but because of the size of the baby, she had to have a C-section Monday. That meant little sleep for Pouncey, who is from Lakeland, Fla., and starred at the University of Florida.

The excitement of joining his twin brother, Mike, as a father wouldn't have allowed him to get much shut-eye, anyway. Shortly after his daughter was born, Pouncey sent out a text message to a group that included Tomlin and the Steelers' offensive linemen.

"Coach (Tomlin) said maybe he'll mature a little bit more now that he has a kid," guard Ramon Foster said with a laugh. "He's a proud dad, I know that much."

Players have Tuesdays off during the season when it is a standard week. But since Pouncey took off Monday, he couldn't just relax after returning to Pittsburgh on Tuesday.

"I had to come here and watch film with coach Kugs," Pouncey said, referring to offensive line coach Sean Kugler.

Pouncey, who participated in practice Wednesday, said he is still catching up on his sleep. Foster said Pouncey will be fine.

"Maurkice is one of those high-energy guys," Foster said. "He might not feel it until he's 40."

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