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Fresh water for fracking flows to Frazer well sites

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By Jodi Weigand and Michael Aubele
Monday, March 19, 2012
 

Range Resources has laid a temporary pipeline through three townships to pump in water needed for hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, to complete five wells in Frazer.

The 8-inch, high-density polyethylene pipeline begins at a water storage site in Harmar, runs a short distance along Log Cabin Road to Little Deer Creek Road in Indiana Township, then up a private drive through a Duquesne Light waste area to the well pad in Frazer.

The pipeline should be gone by early April, said Range Resources spokesman Matt Pitzarella.

Range is using the pipes instead of trucking the water to the well site. However, trucks will still haul water to the "tank farm" in Harmar, about a mile from the well pad in Frazer.

"The pipelines are cheaper than the trucks," he said.

The pipe will carry fresh water to the well pad for the fracking process, Pitzarella said, in which the water is pumped underground to create cracks in the shale to release natural gas. No water from the well site will be pumped back through the pipe, according to Pitzarella.

Range Resources began constructing the pipeline about two weeks ago and has secured all the rights of way needed, Pitzarella said. About two dozen homeowners agreed to allow use of their property, he said.

Compensation for property owners are individually negotiated, Pitzarella said.

Lillian Hepler, who lives at 23 Little Deer Creek Road, said she didn't want Range using her property. She was afraid they would need to dig up her yard.

"I just don't want that," she said. "We had sewers put in here a couple years ago, and we had a big mess. Plus, I really just don't trust these people."

Hepler said Range offered her $2,000 for the temporary use of her property.

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