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Women poets speak at University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg campus

Mary Pickels
| Friday, Jan. 26, 2018, 3:33 p.m.
Poet Mwende 'FreeQuency' Katwiwa, a 2017 TED Women speaker, will speak in a free, public event Jan. 30 at the University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg.
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Poet Mwende 'FreeQuency' Katwiwa, a 2017 TED Women speaker, will speak in a free, public event Jan. 30 at the University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg.
Poet Jehanne Dubrow will present a reading and book signing Jan. 29 at the University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg, opening the spring season of the Veterans Write Workshops.
www.jehannedubrow.com
Poet Jehanne Dubrow will present a reading and book signing Jan. 29 at the University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg, opening the spring season of the Veterans Write Workshops.

Two women poets will address audiences at upcoming readings at the University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg, both free and open to the public.

At 7 p.m. Jan. 29, the Veterans Write Workshop and the Pitt-Greensburg Written/Spoken Series welcomes award-winning poet Jehanne Dubrow for a reading and book signing in Village Hall 118.

The event opens the spring season for the Veterans Write Workshops.

Attending veterans will receive a free copy of Dubrow's latest book, " Dots & Dashes ," winner of the Crab Orchard Series in Poetry competition.

Dubrow's poetry, creative nonfiction, and book reviews have appeared in numerous publications, including "The New York Times Magazine" and "The New England Review."

An associate professor of creative writing at the University of North Texas, Dubrow has received numerous prizes for her poetry.

She will be joined by Veterans Write co-directors Gretchen Uhrinek and Jeff Martin.

Martin, a visiting professor of English at Duquesne University, is a fiction and nonfiction writer whose work has been published in national and international journals.

Uhrinek, a Pitt-Greensburg alumna, received the university's prestigious Joan Didion Award for Creative Nonfiction and the Scott Turow Prize for Fiction.

A reception and book signing will follow the readings.

Immigrant, author, artist

Mwende "FreeQuency" Katwiwa, third place winner at the 2015 Individual World Poetry Slam, describes herself as an immigrant, queer, womyn speaker, writer and performer.

She will speak at 7 p.m. Jan. 30 in the Mary Lou Campana Chapel and Lecture Center.

She is an international touring author, host, youth-worker, social-justice lecturer, teaching artist and workshop leader.

Katwiwa is a founding member of the New Orleans chapter of BYP100 , a group of activists and organizers creating freedom and justice for all black people.

She runs the Young Women with a Vision aftershool program in New Orleans and blogs with the African fashion and culture blog Noirlinians.

Her work with reproductive justice, #BlackLivesMatter and LGBTQ+ advocacy and poetry has been featured in Upworthy, OkayAfrica, TEDx and the New York Times, among others.

Details: greensburg.pitt.edu

Mary Pickels is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 724-836-5401 or mpickels@tribweb.com or via Twitter @MaryPickels.

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