Actress Jessica Biel clarifies stance on vaccinations after backlash | TribLIVE.com
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Actress Jessica Biel clarifies stance on vaccinations after backlash

Emily Balser
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Actress Jessica Biel insists she’s not against vaccinations after she raised concerns when she met with anti-vaccine advocate Robert F. Kennedy Jr. about a new bill that would limit medical exemptions in California.

Kennedy shared a photo as they headed to California’s capitol to lobby against the bill.

The Sacramento Bee reports the bill would require the state’s Department of Public Health to create a uniform document for doctors to administer an exemption. Public health officials would then review and sign off on the doctor’s judgment, according to national guidelines. The department also would put the physician’s name, license number and reasons for issuing the exemption into a database.

People immediately took to social media to drag Biel about her decision to meet with Kennedy and lobby against the bill, categorizing her with famous anti-vaccine celebrities like Jenny McCarthy.

Biel and her husband, singer Justin Timberlake, are parents to son, Silas.

After the backlash Biel posted on Instagram where she said, “I am not against vaccinations — I support children getting vaccinations and I also support families having the right to make educated medical decisions for their children alongside their physicians.”

View this post on Instagram

This week I went to Sacramento to talk to legislators in California about a proposed bill. I am not against vaccinations — I support children getting vaccinations and I also support families having the right to make educated medical decisions for their children alongside their physicians. My concern with #SB277 is solely regarding medical exemptions. My dearest friends have a child with a medical condition that warrants an exemption from vaccinations, and should this bill pass, it would greatly affect their family’s ability to care for their child in this state. That’s why I spoke to legislators and argued against this bill. Not because I don’t believe in vaccinations, but because I believe in giving doctors and the families they treat the ability to decide what’s best for their patients and the ability to provide that treatment. I encourage everyone to read more on this issue and to learn about the intricacies of #SB277. Thank you to everyone who met with me this week to engage in this important discussion!

A post shared by Jessica Biel (@jessicabiel) on

Biel said in the post the reason she was lobbying against the bill is because she has a friend with a children who needs a medical exemption and the bill would affect their family.

“That’s why I spoke to legislators and argued against this bill,” she said. “Not because I don’t believe in vaccinations, but because I believe in giving doctors and the families they treat the ability to decide what’s best for their patients and the ability to provide that treatment.”

Some people still weren’t convinced, though.

Emily Balser is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Emily at 724-226-4680, [email protected] or via Twitter .

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