ShareThis Page
‘Boys N the Hood’ director John Singleton in coma as a result of stroke | TribLIVE.com
Celebrity News

‘Boys N the Hood’ director John Singleton in coma as a result of stroke

Associated Press
1075305_web1_1075305-c8be0961032b4652a4b1f98241960218
AP
John Singleton arrives at the 70th annual Directors Guild of America Awards in Beverly Hills, Calif. The ‘Boyz N the Hood’ director suffered a stroke last week and remains hospitalized, according to a statement from his family on Saturday, April 20, 2019.

LOS ANGELES — “Boyz N the Hood” director John Singleton is in a coma at a Los Angeles hospital eight days after suffering a major stroke, court papers filed Thursday showed.

The 51-year-old director’s condition was revealed in a court filing from his mother, Shelia Ward, who is requesting she be immediately appointed his temporary conservator to make medical and financial decisions for him while he is incapacitated.

Singleton’s family had previously announced that he’d had a stroke on April 17, but there had been no details revealed about the seriousness of his condition.

Friends, colleagues and fans including Viola Davis, Mark Wahlberg and Guillermo Del Toro have offered prayers and wished Singleton well since the announcement.

Singleton became the first black director to receive an Academy Award nomination when he was cited for his debut feature, “Boyz N the Hood.” The 1991 film about the lives of young men in South Central Los Angeles starred Cuba Gooding, Jr., Ice Cube, Angela Bassett and Laurence Fishburne.

His other films include 1993’s “Poetic Justice,” which starred Janet Jackson and Tupac Shakur, 1997’s “Rosewood,” and 2003’s “2 Fast 2 Furious.”

Singleton’s recent projects include the FX TV series “Snowfall,” a crime drama set in 1980s Los Angeles.

The documents put the value of Singleton’s estate at $1.4 million.

The papers say that at the time of the stroke, Singleton was engaged in several business deals and had been set to sign a lucrative settlement agreement on or around April 30. The documents say that if a conservator cannot sign the papers on his behalf, it will mean a big financial loss.

The documents also include a doctor’s statement that Singleton is incapable of giving consent for medical treatment.

Singleton had no existing medical directives in place before the stroke, the documents stated.

It’s not clear whether the temporary conservatorship has been granted.

Messages left with Singleton’s publicist and his mother’s attorney were not immediately returned.

The family had initially acknowledged on Saturday that Singleton had suffered a stroke, saying he was “under great medical care” in an intensive care unit.

Categories: AandE | Celebrity News
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.