Felicity Huffman released 11 days into 14-day prison term | TribLIVE.com
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Felicity Huffman released 11 days into 14-day prison term

Associated Press
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AP
In this Sept. 13, file photo, actress Felicity Huffman leaves federal court in Boston with her brother Moore Huffman Jr., left, after she was sentenced in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal. Huffman was sentenced to 14 days in federal prison in Dublin, Calif., but was released early Friday.

Actress Felicity Huffman was released Friday morning from a federal prison in California on the 11th day of a 14-day sentence for her role in the college admissions scandal, authorities said.

The “Desperate Housewives” star was released from the low-security prison for women on Friday morning because under prison policy, inmates scheduled for weekend release are let out on Friday, the U.S. Bureau of Prisons said.

Her husband, actor William H. Macy, dropped off Huffman — aka inmate No. 77806-112 — at the Federal Correctional Institution, Dublin in the San Francisco Bay Area on Oct. 15.

A federal judge in Boston last month sentenced Huffman, 56, to two weeks in prison, a $30,000 fine, 250 hours of community service and a year’s probation after she pleaded guilty to fraud and conspiracy for paying an admissions consultant $15,000 to have a proctor correct her daughter’s SAT answers.

The Emmy-award winning actress tearfully apologized at her sentencing, saying, “I was frightened. I was stupid, and I was so wrong.”

Huffman was the first parent sentenced in the scandal, which was the biggest college admissions case ever prosecuted by the Justice Department.

Fellow actress Lori Loughlin, her fashion designer husband and others are awaiting trial.

Categories: AandE | Celebrity News
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