Popular YouTube ‘King of Random’ dies in paraglider accident | TribLIVE.com
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Popular YouTube ‘King of Random’ dies in paraglider accident

Associated Press
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“King of Random” YouTube
YouTube’s “King of Random,” Jonathan Grant Thompson, was found dead Monday, July 29, 2019, after a paraglider crash.

SALT LAKE CITY — The creator of the YouTube channel “King of Random,” whose experiments and hands-on science tips drew 11 million subscribers, has died in a Utah paragliding crash.

Jonathan Grant Thompson, 38, was found dead on Monday, Washington County Sheriff’s Lt. David Crouse said. The cause is under investigation.

Thompson’s videos have been watched more than a billion times.

They range from filling a balloon with liquid nitrogen to making a laser-assisted blowgun. Some were practical, like how to get better cell phone reception, while others were whimsical, like building a raft from rice cakes.

His most popular video was about how to make gummy candies in the shape of Legos.

Thompson made headlines last year after complaints about explosions in his suburban Salt Lake City backyard brought criminal charges. He agreed to make safety-themed videos as part of a plea deal.

His many followers are expressing their condolences, calling him a creative force on the platform whose unconventional approach sparked their interest in science.

YouTube said in a tweet that he was a “gifted, passionate and endlessly curious creator.”

Thompson had been making videos since 2010.

Categories: AandE | Celebrity News
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