ShareThis Page
Celebrity News

Princess Eugenie weds her beau at Windsor Castle

| Friday, Oct. 12, 2018, 7:33 a.m.
The Right Rev. David Conner, Dean of Windsor conducts the wedding ceremony between Princess Eugenie of York and Jack Brooksbank in St George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle, near London, England, Friday Oct. 12, 2018.
The Right Rev. David Conner, Dean of Windsor conducts the wedding ceremony between Princess Eugenie of York and Jack Brooksbank in St George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle, near London, England, Friday Oct. 12, 2018.

WINDSOR, England (AP) — Princess Eugenie married tequila executive Jack Brooksbank in a solemn ceremony at St. George’s Chapel on the grounds of Windsor Castle Friday.

The 28-year-old bride, granddaughter of Queen Elizabeth II, is ninth in line to the British throne. She wore a gown by British designers Peter Pilotto and Christopher De Vos and a diamond and emerald encrusted tiara.

The queen and her husband, Prince Philip, attended the wedding, along with other senior royals.

The couple got engaged in January when Brooksbank, 32, proposed during a holiday trip to Nicaragua in Central America. They had dated for seven years.

Crowds gathered outside Windsor Castle ahead of Britain’s second royal wedding of the year on a gusty day that required early arrivals to hold onto their elegant hats as they crossed the manicured grounds.

The queen will host a champagne luncheon for the newlyweds shortly after the ceremony.

The couple married in the same venue used in May by Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, who is now known as the Duchess of Sussex. The royal standard was flying atop the complex Friday, indicating that the queen was in residence.

Harry and Meghan are attending, along with Prince William and his wife Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge. Their 5-year-old son, Prince George, will be a page boy, and Princess Charlotte, 3, will be one of six bridesmaids.

Eugenie, 28, works at a contemporary art gallery. Her sister, Princess Beatrice, served as maid of honor. They are the daughters of Prince Andrew and Sarah Ferguson, who are divorced but enjoy an amicable relationship.

Eugenie told ITV, which broadcast the hour-long service in Britain, that she was both excited and a bit on edge.

“It’s nerve-wracking and a bit scary and all the things that come with getting married, but at the end of the day you get to marry the person you love,” she said.

The couple has invited 1,200 members of the public to come onto the castle grounds for a closer glimpse of proceedings. They also plan to take a carriage ride through parts of Windsor after the ceremony.

Gregory Katz and Martin Benedyk are Associated Press writers.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me