ShareThis Page
Candy Crush vs. Mortal Kombat for Video Game Hall of Fame | TribLIVE.com
More A&E

Candy Crush vs. Mortal Kombat for Video Game Hall of Fame

Associated Press
913502_web1_CandyCrush
flickr.com
Candy Crush

ROCHESTER, N.Y. — The World Video Game Hall of Fame fielded thousands of nominations for the Class of 2019 from more than 100 countries, hall officials said Thursday after narrowing the field to 12.

“Will ‘Centipede’ devour the competition? Can ‘Mortal Kombat’ fight its way to victory? Will ‘Microsoft Windows Solitaire’ play its cards correctly?” the Hall of Fame said in a news release revealing this year’s 12 finalists. “Can ‘Super Mario Kart’ speed past the finish line? Is ‘NBA 2K’ a slam dunk?”

The other contenders are: “Candy Crush,” ”Colossal Cave Adventure,” ”Dance Dance Revolution,” ”Half-Life,” ”Myst,” ”Sid Meier’s Civilization” and “Super Smash Bros. Melee.”

An expert committee will choose which of the finalists will be inducted May 2. Gamers can weigh in with an online ballot through March 28.

The World Video Game Hall of Fame , housed at The Strong museum in Rochester, recognizes individual electronic games of all types — arcade, console, computer, hand-held and mobile. Those deemed worthy of the hall have left a mark on the video game industry or pop culture and been popular over time and across countries.

Last year, “John Madden Football,” ”Spacewar!” ”Tomb Raider” and “Final Fantasy VII” were honored. The Class of 2019 will be the fifth group to go into the hall since it was established in 2015.

Newzoo analysts estimated the video game market at nearly $140 billion in 2018, with more than 2.3 billion active gamers. The numbers dwarf the $43.4 billion in revenue generated by the American film industry.

The 12 Hall of Fame finalists span decades, gaming platforms and countries of origin, but all have had an impact, said Jon-Paul Dyson, director of The Strong’s International Center for the History of Electronic Games.

“Whether it’s a true pioneer like ‘Colossal Cave Adventure,’ a mobile gaming phenomenon like ‘Candy Crush’ that’s been played by hundreds of millions, or a game like ‘Mortal Kombat’ that pushed boundaries and changed the landscape of the gaming industry,” Dyson said, “they’re among the most influential games of all time.”

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.