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Save those snowballs: Carnegie Science Center plans Snowball Day on June 21

Mary Pickels
| Tuesday, Jan. 2, 2018, 10:18 a.m.
The recent snowfall offers plenty of fluffy material to make snowballs. Pittsburgh's Carnegie Science Center is again hosting Snowball Day, which will be held on June 21 and offer visitors bringing snowballs the chance to pay what they wish for admission. In this Feb. 7, 2015, photo, James Piersol, 5, of Perryopolis (right) taunts friends while  snowball fighting during Winterfest at Ohiopyle.
Steph Chambers | Trib Total Media
The recent snowfall offers plenty of fluffy material to make snowballs. Pittsburgh's Carnegie Science Center is again hosting Snowball Day, which will be held on June 21 and offer visitors bringing snowballs the chance to pay what they wish for admission. In this Feb. 7, 2015, photo, James Piersol, 5, of Perryopolis (right) taunts friends while snowball fighting during Winterfest at Ohiopyle.

Freezers recently emptied of Christmas cookies may soon fill with snowballs, in preparation for the Carnegie Science Center's annual Snowball Day, scheduled for June 21.

The last week's snowfall and this week's morning delays as school resumes following the frigid holiday allow ample opportunity to form a few snowballs.

Save them for the Summer Solstice, which the science center will celebrate at its site on Pittsburgh's North Shore.

Visitors who show up with snowballs in hand on the first day of summer will be able to choose what they pay for general admission. They also can launch their snowballs into the Ohio River (weather permitting).

Visitors of all ages are invited to participate, and to remember these snowy facts from the Carnegie Science Center:

• Snow forms from tiny crystals in clouds. Snow is not frozen rain; that's called sleet.

• Most snowflakes melt before reaching the ground.

• No two snowflakes are identical.

• Each snowflake is made up of two to 200 separate crystals, on average.

• Although it appears white, snow actually is transparent. Snow crystals act as prisms and break up the sun's light into the entire color spectrum. The human eye can't handle that kind of sensory overload, so it is processed as white. If a region's soil contains more iron, giving it a reddish tinge, snow may appear pink — wind will blow dirt and dust into the atmosphere and clouds, where the snow crystals form initially.

Details: 412-237-3400 or carnegiesciencecenter.org

Mary Pickels is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 724-836-5401 or mpickels@tribweb.com or via Twitter @MaryPickels.

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