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Broadway star Megan Hilty to perform at August Wilson Center

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop
| Tuesday, May 8, 2018, 12:15 p.m.
She has played Glinda in Broadway’s “Wicked” and Ivy Lynn in NBC’s “Smash.” Now, Megan Hilty returns to Pittsburgh for “The Art of Aging,” fundraising gala from 6 to 9 p.m. on May 14 at the August Wilson Center in Pittsburgh.
COURTESY JEWISH ASSOCIATION ON AGING
She has played Glinda in Broadway’s “Wicked” and Ivy Lynn in NBC’s “Smash.” Now, Megan Hilty returns to Pittsburgh for “The Art of Aging,” fundraising gala from 6 to 9 p.m. on May 14 at the August Wilson Center in Pittsburgh.
She has played Glinda in Broadway’s “Wicked” and Ivy Lynn in NBC’s “Smash.” Now, Megan Hilty returns to Pittsburgh for “The Art of Aging,” fundraising gala from 6 to 9 p.m. on May 14 at the August Wilson Center in Pittsburgh.
COURTESY JEWISH ASSOCIATION ON AGING
She has played Glinda in Broadway’s “Wicked” and Ivy Lynn in NBC’s “Smash.” Now, Megan Hilty returns to Pittsburgh for “The Art of Aging,” fundraising gala from 6 to 9 p.m. on May 14 at the August Wilson Center in Pittsburgh.

She has played Glinda in Broadway's "Wicked" and Ivy Lynn in NBC's "Smash." Now, Megan Hilty returns to Pittsburgh for "The Art of Aging," fundraising gala from 6 to 9 p.m. on May 14 at the August Wilson Center in Pittsburgh.

A champagne toast and pre-concert reception kick off Hilty's solo stage performance of Broadway favorites and fresh interpretations of contemporary songwriters.

Hilty made her Broadway debut in "Wicked" opposite Tony Award-winner Idina Menzel after graduating from Carnegie Mellon University's School of Drama in 2004. She has also starred on Broadway as Doralee in "9 to 5: The Musical," Dolly Parton's adaptation of the popular film.

As a central cast member of "Smash," she played an actress desperate to land the lead in a musical about the life of Marilyn Monroe. Between seasons, she starred as Lorelei Lee in the New York City production of "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes."

In 2015, Hilty played the role of Brooke Ashton in Broadway's "Noises Off" and received a Tony nomination, as well as Drama Desk and Drama League Award nominations.

Proceeds from the event benefit the Jewish Association on Aging's Free Care Fund, which annually provides 10 percent of its operating budget in free care and services to seniors in the Pittsburgh community.

We asked her a few questions via email:

Question: What made you want to be part of The Art of Aging gala?

Answer: Proceeds from this benefit go to the Jewish Association on Aging's Free Care Fund, which brings free care and services to seniors in Pittsburgh. I went to Carnegie Mellon University so it's quite an honor to be a part of this gala which helps take care of so many residents of the community that I called home for so many years.

Q: What was your time like at Carnegie Mellon University?

A: I'm not going to lie ­— it was tough! They were incredibly long days that really tested us and stretched us beyond what we thought our limitations were. But I am so grateful for every minute of it. Any time I think I have a busy schedule now, I'm always comforted by the thought that if I could make it through that rigorous schedule at CMU, whatever life throws at me after that is a piece of cake!

Q: You have done so many things — is there one moment in your career that stands out or that most surprised you? Please explain.

A: I was surprised to learn how much I love doing concerts. Originally, I was terrified of performing by myself and being myself — it's the only time I'm not playing any kind of character. But over the years, I've really grown to love being in charge of my own shows and sharing intimate parts of my life with stories and singing the songs I love.

Q: What is next for Megan Hilty?

A: I have a couple of really cool projects that I'm working on but I'm not allowed to talk about them quite yet! Other than that, I have a bunch of concerts coming up and my two little kids keep me insanely busy.

Details: 412-420-4000 or jaapgh.org

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 724-853-5062 or jharrop@tribweb.com or via Twitter @Jharrop_Trib.

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