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Vintage Market Days combines best of the past, present for Pittsburgh area

Mary Pickels
| Wednesday, July 11, 2018, 11:10 a.m.
North Carolina residents Rachel and Chad Lynam, shown above with their son, William, in this 2017 photo, are planning the region's first Vintage Market Days of Tri-State Pittsburgh event at the Monroeville Convention Center July 13-15.
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North Carolina residents Rachel and Chad Lynam, shown above with their son, William, in this 2017 photo, are planning the region's first Vintage Market Days of Tri-State Pittsburgh event at the Monroeville Convention Center July 13-15.
Monroeville Convention Center is the site of Pittsburgh's first Vintage Market Days of Tri-State Pittsburgh, set for July 13-15.
Facebook/vintagemarketdaysoftri-statePittsburgh
Monroeville Convention Center is the site of Pittsburgh's first Vintage Market Days of Tri-State Pittsburgh, set for July 13-15.
Pops of color, something old, something gently used, something that will brighten up that empty corner or bring a kitchen to life. Those are the types of merchandise visitors can expect at Vintage Market Days of Tri-State Pittsburgh, its organizers say.
Facebook/vintagemarketdaysoftri-statepittsburgh
Pops of color, something old, something gently used, something that will brighten up that empty corner or bring a kitchen to life. Those are the types of merchandise visitors can expect at Vintage Market Days of Tri-State Pittsburgh, its organizers say.
Creature comforts, home decor, original art and handmade treasures are promised at the first Vintage Market Days of Tri-State Pittsburgh, planned for July 13-15 at the Monroeville Convention Center.
Facebook/vintagemarketdaysoftri-statepittsburgh
Creature comforts, home decor, original art and handmade treasures are promised at the first Vintage Market Days of Tri-State Pittsburgh, planned for July 13-15 at the Monroeville Convention Center.
Those who enjoy browsing flea markets, estate sales, antique stores and vintage clothing shops likely will enjoy the wares of artisans, craftspeople, pickers and more participating in the Vintage Market Days of Tri-State Pittsburgh this weekend.
Those who enjoy browsing flea markets, estate sales, antique stores and vintage clothing shops likely will enjoy the wares of artisans, craftspeople, pickers and more participating in the Vintage Market Days of Tri-State Pittsburgh this weekend.

The words "vintage" and "farmhouse" may conjure up visions of Mason jars, floral arrangements, slightly distressed furnishings, home decor more cozy than formal, more comfy than sophisticated.

Think makers' markets.

Estate sales.

Even the HGTV show "Fixer Upper," where older homes with "good bones" are transformed into bright, airy houses often accented with refinished or retro furnishings.

Those with a taste toward the traditional, old-fashioned, antique, upcycled or repurposed can browse everything from original art, antiques, clothing, jewelry and home decor to outdoor furnishings at the July 13-15 Vintage Market Days of Tri-State Pittsburgh .

Franchise owners Chad and Rachel Lynam of Greensboro, N.C., are organizing the "Vintage Farmhouse" themed-event at the Monroeville Convention Center .

The husband and wife, 32 and 31 respectively, also oversee the Raleigh event in their home state.

"It's a new venture for us," Chad Lynam says.

It's also family friendly, he adds.

"We want it to be a local showcase for artists and vendors with food and music," Lynam says.

"Each owner kind of makes (the market) their own. They decide on the location, the vendors," Rachel Lynam says.

Chad Lynam works full time as a CPA; his wife is a former high school teacher who now stays home with their toddler son, William.

The vintage market is a side venture for him, and more of a full-time effort for his wife, Lynam says.

But he finds himself on familiar ground with the new business.

"I grew up going to flea markets. My parents were very involved in that community, and were makers. Then I started getting into making as well," Lynam says.

He and his father used to acquire old barn tin and make kitchen blacksplashes and other unique craft pieces, selling them at flea markets and events.

The term "vintage" often is defined as "dated from the past" or "from a previous era," and that sits well with the Lynams.

On their website, they describe their dream as creating a "context for people to gather who have a similar proclivity for the things (and people) that are slightly worn but better for it."

Farmhouse familiar

Lynam's parents told the couple about Vintage Market Days.

"I became a CPA. I missed it. I thought I'd love to be involved in that scene again," he says. "I'm not a maker. I'm kind of the organized one. I like the spreadsheets. It works out well. There are parts (of planning) that both of us enjoy," Rachel Lynam says.

Browsers won't find "mass-produced" products, she says.

Rather, adds her husband, they can expect "something with a story behind it."

They chose the tri-state Pittsburgh site, expecting it to have a more regional draw, Chad Lynam says. "I love Pittsburgh. I travel quite a bit, and I've been to Pittsburgh a lot."

"I thought, I betcha a lot of folks here are going to enjoy this kind of event. Pittsburgh was our first choice," Lynam adds.

Approximately 115 vendors, most local to the region, are expected to fill the Monroeville Convention Center throughout the weekend.

"It's a curated event. It's a vintage experience, not just a sale," Lynam says. "It's not just people putting things on a table. The vendors who come are selected in a jury selection."

The event will be indoors, and include live music and four food trucks.

Additionally, food vendors will offer what the couple calls "consumable yummies," including pretzels, baked goods and candy.

In other words, the couple says, something for everyone.

Mary Pickels is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 724-836-5401 or mpickels@tribweb.com or via Twitter @MaryPickels.

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