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5 ways to celebrate Father's Day with dad in Pittsburgh

| Friday, June 15, 2018, 8:18 a.m.
John Siharath plays with his son Carlito Anthony Silharath while they had breakfast together on Father's Day 2016 at Brother Tom's Bakery and Deli on Main Street in Sharpsburg. June 17 is Father's Day so get out and spent time with dad this weekend.
Tribune-Review File Photo
John Siharath plays with his son Carlito Anthony Silharath while they had breakfast together on Father's Day 2016 at Brother Tom's Bakery and Deli on Main Street in Sharpsburg. June 17 is Father's Day so get out and spent time with dad this weekend.
Pirates pitcher Jameson Taillon delivers against the Blue Jays during the second inning of a spring training game in 2017, at Olympic Stadium in Montreal. Taillon joins catcher Francisco Cervelli and second baseman Josh Harrison at the 'Catch for Cancer' event at PNC Park  on June 17 to raise awareness for prostate cancer.
USA Today Sports
Pirates pitcher Jameson Taillon delivers against the Blue Jays during the second inning of a spring training game in 2017, at Olympic Stadium in Montreal. Taillon joins catcher Francisco Cervelli and second baseman Josh Harrison at the 'Catch for Cancer' event at PNC Park on June 17 to raise awareness for prostate cancer.
The August Wilson Center in Downtown Pittsburgh will host the Pittsburgh International Jazz Festival June 15-17.
submitted
The August Wilson Center in Downtown Pittsburgh will host the Pittsburgh International Jazz Festival June 15-17.
The upcoming Super Science Saturdays at the Carnegie Museum in Oakland is June 16. It's Jurassic Day where from noon to 4 p.m. guests can wander through the museum’s world class “Dinosaurs in Their Time” exhibition hall.
CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY
The upcoming Super Science Saturdays at the Carnegie Museum in Oakland is June 16. It's Jurassic Day where from noon to 4 p.m. guests can wander through the museum’s world class “Dinosaurs in Their Time” exhibition hall.
The Clarks, who released their 10th album of original material “Madly In Love At The End Of The World,” on June 8, will perform during Vine Rewind, a two-day music festival and block party happening in the city’s Strip District neighborhood July 28 and 29.
THE CLARKS
The Clarks, who released their 10th album of original material “Madly In Love At The End Of The World,” on June 8, will perform during Vine Rewind, a two-day music festival and block party happening in the city’s Strip District neighborhood July 28 and 29.

The weather is supposed to be hot this weekend so get out and treat dad. It's about celebrating him whether you play catch, take in a ball game, visit a museum or ride down a waterslide. Sit back and relax to some jazz at the August Wilson Center or take the kids to learn about dinosaurs. Fans of The Clarks will get a chance to celebrate with the band at a special performance at Stage AE this weekend.

PLAY CATCH

The Pittsburgh Pirates and Allegheny Health Network have teamed for the "Catch for Cancer" event at from 9 to 10 a.m. June 17 at PNC Park on the North Side. It's a way to create awareness for prostate cancer, the second leading cancer cause of cancer death among men in the U.S. Second baseman Josh Harrison, catcher Francisco Cervelli and pitcher Jameson Taillon will be on hand to meet fans and toss the ball around. After the event, the Pirates host the Cincinnati Reds at 1:35 p.m. and are giving away hats to kids and dads.

Pre-registration is highly suggested.

Details: pirates.com or supportahn.org


OTHER WAYS TO CELEBRATE DAD

June 17 is Father's Day so grab dad and spent some time with him.

The Senator John Heinz History Center and Children's Museum of Pittsburgh are hosting Father's Day events where dads get a 50 percent discount on admission. Take him to Sandcastle water park in Homestead for free.

Details: heinzhistorycenter.org or pittsburghkids.org or sandcastle.com


JAZZ IT UP

The Pittsburgh International Jazz Festival is June 15-17 and kicks off with the Taste of Jazz Giveaway at 9 p.m. June 15 at the August Wilson Center, Downtown. There will be three stages of free, live entertainment of the best in jazz. Artists include Marcus Miller, Gregory Porter, Kenny Garrett, Shemekia Copeland and more.

Details: pittsburghjazzfest.org


IT'S SCIENTIFIC

Celebrate with dinosaurs, discover secrets of DNA and learn what it is like to be scientist at Super Science Saturdays at the Carnegie Museum in Oakland. June 16 is Jurassic Day, where from noon to 4 p.m., guests can wander through the museum's world-class "Dinosaurs in Their Time" exhibition hall, dig for fossils in "Bone Hunters' Quarry" and take part in hands-on, dinosaur-themed activities. Meet reptiles from the museum's living collection, meet a dinosaur puppet and watch "Jurassic Park" in the Earth Theater.

Details: carnegiemnh.org


SING ALONG

The Clarks, who just released their 10th album of original material "Madly In Love At The End Of The World," will celebrate with a show on June 16 at Stage AE on the North Side.

The album is a lively ride down a rural lane, laced with love, mourning and questions about where it all goes from here.

With a career spanning almost 32 years — with all original members. This month marks the 30th anniversary of the group's first release, "I'll Tell You What Man."

Early on, The Clarks were once described as a bunch of out-of-tune country hicks. The band took offense to these comments, saying they were never country hicks.

The four original members Scott Blasey, vocals and acoustic guitar, Rob James, 6- and 12-string electric guitars, vocals, Greg Joseph, bass and vocals and David Minarik, drums and vocals are joined by fellow touring mates Gary Jacob, Skip Sanders and Noah Minarik. With a highlight reel that includes the "Late Show with David Letterman" and "The Simpsons" The Clarks are enjoying their stage time together now more than ever.

Details: clarksonline.com

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