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At 48, Somerset Antique Show is almost an antique itself

Mary Pickels
| Thursday, Aug. 9, 2018, 1:33 a.m.
Keep a keen eye peeled for items to decorate a home or add to collections during the Aug. 11 48th Annual Somerset Antique Show.
Keep a keen eye peeled for items to decorate a home or add to collections during the Aug. 11 48th Annual Somerset Antique Show.
Shoppers can enjoy free admission and parking at the 48th Annual Somerset Antique Show, held rain or shine on Aug. 11.
Shoppers can enjoy free admission and parking at the 48th Annual Somerset Antique Show, held rain or shine on Aug. 11.
The streets of uptown Somerset will be filled with vendors for the 48th Annual Somerset Antique Show, planned for Aug. 11.
The streets of uptown Somerset will be filled with vendors for the 48th Annual Somerset Antique Show, planned for Aug. 11.

Almost 50 years ago, about four dozen local dealers put together the first Somerset Antique Show.

On Aug. 11, the 48th Annual Somerset Antique Show will be held, now with more than 100 vendors and about 5,000 visitors, Sandy Berkebile says.

“We took it over and expanded over the years,” says Berkebile, office manager for show sponsor Somerset County Chamber of Commerce.

“We have a lot of repeat vendors. Some are starting to retire now, and we have a couple of new ones. Most are from Pennsylvania and bordering states, with some Southern states as well,” she says.

“People come from all over, multiple states; some come in for the weekend and do other things as well,” she adds.

“We have quite a variety (of antiques). We do have a number of furniture dealers. Over the years, they’ve told us it’s a good show for dealers who have furniture. They like to bring their best pieces because the show is a good draw,” she says.

“One of the collectibles is 1950s (era) kitchen items. For some reason that is very popular — dinnerware, tablecloths, utensils. Everything was in color in the ’50s. Even the refrigerators were bright pink or turquoise,” Berkebile says.

Lightweight, brightly colored, chunky jewelry, Bakelite is among the most collectible, she says.

Browsers also can peruse sports memorabilia, quilts, glassware, books, paintings, coins and postcards.

As in past years, the event will feature an antique and classic car show from noon to 2 p.m. in the Somerset Trust Co. parking lot on West Main Street.

All food and drink vendors are from Somerset County, and most are nonprofits, Berkebile says.

Details: 814-445-6431 or infosomersetcountychamber.com

Mary Pickels is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Mary at 724-836-5401, mpickels@tribweb.com or via Twitter @MaryPickels.

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