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Smallman Galley's newest restaurant blends Southern barbecue, tacos

| Wednesday, Dec. 26, 2018, 1:33 a.m.
Just a sampling of the tacos that will be available at Ba-Co.
Taylor Blocksom
Just a sampling of the tacos that will be available at Ba-Co.
Just a sampling of the tacos that will be available at Ba-Co.
Taylor Blocksom
Just a sampling of the tacos that will be available at Ba-Co.
Moon Township native Tim Dominick is set to debut his new restaurant, Ba-Co.
Taylor Blocksom
Moon Township native Tim Dominick is set to debut his new restaurant, Ba-Co.

Moon Township native Tim Dominick is set to debut his new restaurant, Ba-Co in the Strip District’s restaurant launch pad Smallman Galley on Jan. 8.

The menu will highlight two of his favorite cuisines: southern barbecue and tacos.

When creating the concept, he thought about the food he gravitates to when traveling and came up with the street food concept: a southern profile with a Latin twist.

“I like the way Latin cuisine balances the flavors of sourness and sweetness and when applied to barbeque, you get a much fuller flavor profile,” says Dominick.

The menu will include a selection of tacos filled with house-smoked meats, like “The Texan” with brisket, Ba-Co barbecue sauce, slaw and yellow pepper mustard, and grilled pineapple. The “Veggin’ Out” filled with rubbed and roasted cauliflower, sweet beetroot pepper sauce, sultanas, cured red cabbage and honey with confit garlic aioli.

Dominick’s excited for everyone to try his favorite taco, the “Not Your Grandma’s” taco filled with Nashville hot chicken, pimento cheese, pickled onions and a cabbage slaw made with honey and confit garlic aioli.

The “Not Tacos” section of the menu, will have fun options like housemade tater tots tossed in a signature rub with caramelized onions, cheese sauce and barbecue sauce. And, brunch will include Chicken and Pancakes with the southern hot chicken, apple butter, honey and crème fraiche all served on fluffy, eastern-style pancakes.

Dominick is a veteran of the Pittsburgh culinary scene having spent time in the kitchens of Ditka’s, Nemacolin Woodlands and most recently, The Commoner in downtown’s Kimpton Hotel Monaco.

He never planned on opening his own restaurant, but when he saw the opportunity to apply to Smallman Galley, he thought it would be cool to put this own voice out there in the city where he grew up. He says he decided to go for it and hope for the best.

Right out of high school Dominick went to culinary school and then joined the Marines for five years. After his service, he used his GI Bill to attend school for marine biology in Florida. He says when he lived in Florida, he got the taste for southern barbecue and proclaimed he’s tasted almost every spot in Tampa.

“We have always heard from guests that a taco concept would be well received at Smallman Galley, so we were thrilled when Tim applied with Ba-Co,” says Ben Mantica, co-founder of The Galley Group. “We are also really excited to have another veteran-owned business in the space along with Phill and Melanie Milton’s concept, Home.”

Ba-Co will be at Smallman Galley for the next year and Dominic hopes to extend past that year and eventually open up his own brick and mortar location in an up-and-coming area around the city.

Details: facebook.com/bacopgh

Sarah Sudar is a Tribune-Review contributing writer.

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